Creative Therapies with Traumatized Children

Creative Therapies with Traumatized Children

Creative Therapies with Traumatized Children

Creative Therapies with Traumatized Children

Synopsis

"The author presents a practical model called the Regenerative Approach to use when assessing and working therapeutically with traumatized children. Her research has implications for those working in the field of children's development and learning, and provides an important new approach for social workers, creative therapists and all those who work with traumatized children." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

The effects of trauma on the development of young children were not fully understood when society discovered the extent to which children were being sexually abused. As knowledge grew regarding child sexual abuse during the final two decades of the last century, so our understanding of the damage to child development was increased. As a probation officer in 1975, I found myself working with adolescents, so-called 'delinquents', both boys and girls, some of whom were also telling me about their early physical and sexual abuse. The links between the abuse (which had seldom been reported or confirmed) and their subsequent behaviour seemed to be obvious, but there was little research on the subject. The connection with physical abuse was strongly denied by abusing parents who, while admitting the abuse, declared that it was justified punishment for bad behaviour. At that time sexual abuse was rarely discussed, was referred to obliquely by children, was denied by parents, and often by society in general. I was also working with paedophiles, but the compulsive nature of their behaviour was not recognized at the time and no treatment was deemed to be very effective.

However, as research into the subject proliferated, so did the publications. Herman (1981) brought a feminist stance to the subject of father–daughter incest, and Sgroi (1982) introduced a medical perspective to work with survivors. Finkelhor (1984) discussed research and theory in a practical way and threw some light on the motivations of abusers, while Alice Miller (1987) discussed psychotherapy, and stressed the psychological damage caused by abuse. By now working for the NSPCC (National Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Children), I found that there were links between the physically abusive behaviour of some women to their own children, and their own early physical and sexual abuse, and I published a . . .

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