Dementia and Social Inclusion: Marginalised Groups and Marginalised Areas of Dementia Research, Care and Practice

Dementia and Social Inclusion: Marginalised Groups and Marginalised Areas of Dementia Research, Care and Practice

Dementia and Social Inclusion: Marginalised Groups and Marginalised Areas of Dementia Research, Care and Practice

Dementia and Social Inclusion: Marginalised Groups and Marginalised Areas of Dementia Research, Care and Practice

Synopsis

"Taking an in-depth look at dementia research and service development, this book makes essential reading for practitioners, researchers and students working in the field of dementia care." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

Anthea Innes, Carole Archibald and Charlie Murphy

It is widely recognised that dementia as a field of study has grown in popularity in the last 30 years creating an exciting time of opportunity for further theorising dementia and improving practice. Since the 1970s there have been shifts from dementia being the preserve of medics and psychologists to an ever-growing interest in the topic from within the social sciences (Innes 2002) and this is reflected in the terminology used. This has changed from the 'sufferer' of dementia, their families and professional carers to the person with dementia, informal carers and formal carers who often do not have professional qualifications (Bryden 2002; Downs 2000).

The introduction of a new language to discuss dementia does not necessarily mean that changes will have occurred in practice and service development. Despite the progress that has undoubtedly been made in dementia there remain areas that have been largely overlooked. This indicates that within the study of dementia there is a tendency to relegate certain issues, which are often difficult and challenging, to the margins of academic and professional discourses. There are parallels here with how the study of dementia itself was, and perhaps still is, perceived to be difficult and challenging.

Throughout the book a range of topics highlighting issues which have been marginalised within dementia research, care or practice are addressed. For example, people with dementia from minority ethnic groups have been overlooked; the sexuality of people with dementia has been perceived as a taboo topic, as has faecal incontinence. The lives of people with dementia in remote and rural communities have tended to be ignored in favour of an exploration of experiences of people in urban areas. The final phase of the . . .

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