Woody Allen and Philosophy: You Mean My Whole Fallacy Is Wrong?

Woody Allen and Philosophy: You Mean My Whole Fallacy Is Wrong?

Woody Allen and Philosophy: You Mean My Whole Fallacy Is Wrong?

Woody Allen and Philosophy: You Mean My Whole Fallacy Is Wrong?

Synopsis

According to philosophy professors Conard (Marymount Manhattan College) andkoble (Bridgewater State College), who co-edited The Simpsons and Philosophy,ou don't have to be a philosophy major to appreciate Woody Allen's take onife's big questions. They collect 15 views on such themes in his films asumor as philosophical commentary (e.g., Ann

Excerpt

Philosophers love Woody Allen, in part, because he writes us into his movies. What other well-known filmmaker in our time has had philosophy professors as central characters in his films? For that fact alone, I believe the American Philosophical Association would give him a gold statue, if we could afford the gold. But even better, Woody Allen fills his films with the most important philosophical questions and ideas. Some are brilliantly expressed in dialogue. Others underlie the action. Since we have no award to present him for all this, we do the best we can. We show his movies in Philosophy 101. We crack his jokes in class. And we often see the surprised looks of students raised on Adam Sandler and Vin Diesel flicks when they first realize that you can actually grapple with important ideas on the big screen.

Of course, Woody Allen isn't the only creative thinker to deal with the deepest human questions in the context of drama. The ancient Greeks did a decent job of it long ago. And so did certain twentieth-century existentialists. But Woody is different. He's a bit like Sartre or Camus, only funnier. No one can lead us to the edge of the cosmic abyss like Woody, and then hit us with a joke that somehow makes it all easier, and even more memorable. “Not only is there no God,” he quips, “but try getting a plumber on weekends.” And this comedic genius isn't just a comic. He has made some thoroughly serious films as well, with no jokes whatsoever. These also tend to be the ones with no audiences whatsoever. But they are all very well done, and extremely powerful in their explorations of the human condition.

Despite all his great wit and personal charm, Woody Allen is an atheistic existentialist with, understandably, strongly pessimistic inclinations on even a good day, which in his own . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.