Reflective Practice: A Guide for Nurses and Midwives

Reflective Practice: A Guide for Nurses and Midwives

Reflective Practice: A Guide for Nurses and Midwives

Reflective Practice: A Guide for Nurses and Midwives

Excerpt

I have really enjoyed writing the second edition of this book, because it gave me a chance to make it even better than the first edition. Life does not give us many chances to go back and do it again, so I was pleased to revisit this book and do some things a little differently this time. For example, readers tell me how much they love reading the practice stories, so there are many more of them in this edition. In addition, I have included more critical friend responses to the practice stories to demonstrate reflective discussions. The literature has been extended to include recent trends and research in reflective practice. Critiques and debates of reflective practice are described in this book and these are welcomed, as any practice innovation worth its positive reputation must be open to constructive criticism. Other important inclusions in this book are the reflectors, which invite you to reflect on your life and work.

For example, in Chapter 2 I invite you to reflect on some of your childhood memories to locate some rules for living that may now influence the way you work. As a teacher, I usually try to undertake the tasks I construct for students, so I am happy to share with you how I have responded to this reflector.

I was born in Burnie, Tasmania, on Sunday, in the very early morning on the ninth day of September 1951. I was the fourth child of my father Leonard and my mother Johanna. One of my first recollections is as a 3-yearold child. I was standing near a sunny wall at my home at Round Hill near Burnie, and someone holding a box Brownie camera, said: 'Watch the birdie!' I kept looking and looking, but I did not see a birdie. I'll come back to this story later. The second memory is when I was older, around 7 years old, when I remember contemplating infinity, imagining space beyond space beyond space.

From the time I was 5 years of age, my family lived in a working-class housing estate in Burnie, called Acton Estate. It was the kind of neighbor hood where kids walked along the top railing of fences, played cricket on the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.