New-Dialect Formation: The Inevitability of Colonial Englishes

New-Dialect Formation: The Inevitability of Colonial Englishes

New-Dialect Formation: The Inevitability of Colonial Englishes

New-Dialect Formation: The Inevitability of Colonial Englishes

Excerpt

For the past several Northern Hemisphere winters I have been fortunate enough to have been invited to work as a consultant for the Origins of New Zealand English (ONZE) Project, led by Professor Elizabeth Gordon, in the Linguistics Department at the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. This project is without any doubt the most exciting academic project I have had the good fortune to be associated with. It owes most of all to Elizabeth Gordon's vision, insight and energy, and its results have an importance way beyond the shores of New Zealand. I am very grateful to her for allowing me to work on the uniquely rich data source on which the project is based. I am also very grateful indeed to the other colleagues on the project, especially my co-authors on a number of papers (in addition to Elizabeth Gordon), Margaret Maclagan and Gillian Lewis, as well as to Lyle Campbell. Invaluable support of various types was also provided at different times by Mike Clayton, Leigh Nurkka and Stacey Nicholas. Although not all of my ONZE Project colleagues will agree with all of the conclusions presented in this book, I could not have arrived at these conclusions without them. The results of the research of the ONZE Project to date are to be found in a number of papers, by the various project members named here, which are listed in the references. The most important work to stem from the project, however, is the Cambridge University Press book by Elizabeth Gordon et al., New Zealand English: its origins and evolution (2004). Some of . . .

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