Play Today in the Primary School Playground: Life, Learning, and Creativity

Play Today in the Primary School Playground: Life, Learning, and Creativity

Play Today in the Primary School Playground: Life, Learning, and Creativity

Play Today in the Primary School Playground: Life, Learning, and Creativity

Synopsis

"This text examines the free play of children in middle childhood, exploring their actual play activities in the school playground. It counters the widespread concern about the supposed decline in children's play with fresh evidence from Australia, Canada, France, Israel and Britain of the vibrancy, creativity and variety of free play activities, particularly in the school playground. The case studies discuss the many aspects of children's play traditions, including the use of playground space, the ways in which children learn and adapt games and rhymes in multicultural and monocultural settings, children's creative and subversive use of mass media items, and gendered dimensions of play. Emphasis is on children's own perceptions, the importance of free play at a time when it is increasingly under threat, and the benefits that an informed appreciation of contemporary children's play can bring to teaching, the management of school playtime, and intercultural and intergenerational understanding. Audience: undergraduate; postgraduate; research/professional." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

Lona Opie

When, in 1951, my husband Peter and I had finished The Oxford Dictionary of Nursery Rhymes, we began our quest for schoolchildren's lore. We ourselves were poorly educated in the traditions of the schoolyard, having been to private schools, though this had the advantage that most traditional childlore was new to us, and vitally interesting. As it was generally assumed at the time that such lore was on the wane, the purpose of our first survey was to find out how much of it still existed, if any, and whether it varied from place to place, either in quantity or in local association. We began by writing to The Sunday Times, in November 1951, saying what we wanted to do, and asking for help in doing it. It seemed there was already a lot of interest, especially among schoolteachers. We had 151 offers of help from teachers who were willing to get information from their own schools, and to get in touch with friends who were teaching in other parts of the country. Our aim was to obtain material from places as evenly distributed as possible throughout Britain, and from the children who were most in possession of the lore - that is, the age range between 7 and 11, with the emphasis on the 8- and 9-yearolds. We knew it was important to enquire from as many children and in as many schools as possible. in one school very little lore may be found; in another, only a few miles away, the tradition is rich and vibrant. It depends on the school itself, the geography of the playground and the restrictions put upon play. Small country schools, with rural playgrounds that may include a hazel copse and a stream, foster ancient imaginative games of bandits and mothers-and-fathers. Large city schools, with barrack-like buildings and crowded asphalt playgrounds, are nevertheless seething with traditional lore. the children live in a social pressurepot. the constant change of population brings a constant influx of new games, witticisms, stories and jokes. the only full version of the evocative . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.