Strengthening Emotional Ties through Parent-Child-Dyad Art Therapy: Interventions with Infants and Preschoolers

Strengthening Emotional Ties through Parent-Child-Dyad Art Therapy: Interventions with Infants and Preschoolers

Strengthening Emotional Ties through Parent-Child-Dyad Art Therapy: Interventions with Infants and Preschoolers

Strengthening Emotional Ties through Parent-Child-Dyad Art Therapy: Interventions with Infants and Preschoolers

Synopsis

"Parent-child-dyad art therapy is a new and innovative art therapy, in which parent and child share the production of an artwork. Aiming to reinforce or re-establish bonds between children and parents, it provides a space where parents' early unresolved conflicts and children's developmental abilities can be expressed. Lucille Proulx explores many aspects of dyad art therapy including attachment relationship theories, the roles of parents and art therapists in dyad interventions, the importance of the tactile experience and ways in which dyad art therapy could be used to treat other age groups. This original book, with illustrations of parent-child artwork, will be invaluable to mental health professionals in prevention and early childhood fields and also to any parents wishing to enrich their interactions with their children." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

Work with infants and toddlers and their parents has been a relatively new phenomenon in the field of mental health. Over the past 30 years, psychiatrists and psychologists have turned their attention to infants, developing clinical tools to identify problems accurately, and researching theoretical constructs such as 'attachment.' Associations are now in place such as the World Association for Infant Mental Health, and the International Center for Infant Studies, to promote research and clinical work with infants and families.

The study of infants spans many professions adding to the richness of this field. One cannot understand babies without some knowledge of development in the areas of motor function, language, and socialization. Nor can we begin our work unless we have an understanding of the temperament, including the self-regulation capacities of the infant in question. Finally, we have to be aware of the environmental influences on the baby, from the relationship with the primary caregiver to outside factors far from the baby, such as the health of the economy affecting the employment and financial situation of the family. In learning about all these factors, one crosses paths with many professionals who can add information and provide support for the rearing of that child.

Art therapy is one such profession that has turned the spotlight onto infants. I had the privilege of working alongside Lucille Proulx as she developed her creative ideas to promote better interaction between infants and their parents. Until Lucille came along, infant-parent psychotherapy consisted of unstructured play between the parent and infant, and discussion between the parent and therapist. It became apparent as she developed her ideas, that she was one of a handful of people in North America who knew how to use hands-on type of activities to work with very young children. There was much interest at . . .

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