John Knox

John Knox

John Knox

John Knox

Synopsis

"In this new biography of John Knox, Rosalind K. Marshall traces the life of one of the Reformation's central characters. Following his career in Scotland, England, France, Switzerland and Germany, she explains in straightforward terms the issues and beliefs which concerned him so deeply. She also focuses on his relationships with the opposite sex, discussing his notorious First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous Regiment of Women, his dealings with Mary, Queen of Scots and the patient, revealing letters he wrote to his mother-in-law. This book untangles truth from mythology in the life of this strange, complex and determined man and constructs a balanced picture of sixteenth century Scotland that places Knox clearly within the context of change and reformation which was sweeping the whole of Europe. The result is a richer and more complex portrayal of both Scotland and Knox than any hitherto available, and the first modern biography of one of the most famous of all Scottish figures." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

On Thursday 4 September 1561, a small, sturdy man in black marched determinedly into the Palace of Holyroodhouse at the foot of Edinburgh's Canongate. He was in his late forties, with thick dark hair, a ruddy complexion and a shortish beard flecked with grey. Beneath heavy eyebrows, his dark blue eyes were keen and piercing and he bore himself with an air of authority. John Knox, respected Protestant minister of St Giles Church, had been summoned to the royal presence.

She was waiting for him in the great north tower of her palace, the recently returned Queen. Less than three weeks before, on a foggy August morning, she had sailed into Leith in her stately white galley. a monarch at six days old, a bride at fifteen and a widow at seventeen, Mary, Queen of Scots had spent much of her life in France, but now she was back, a Roman Catholic ruling a Protestant realm, hearing Mass in her chapel royal and, so this man believed, threatening by her very presence all that he had been working for in recent years.

He climbed up the stairs of the tower, entered her second floor apartments and there she was, this eighteen-year-old girl, unusually tall and statuesque, like his old adversary, Mary of Guise, her dead . . .

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