Whistleblower Law: A Guide to Legal Protections for Corporate Employees

Whistleblower Law: A Guide to Legal Protections for Corporate Employees

Whistleblower Law: A Guide to Legal Protections for Corporate Employees

Whistleblower Law: A Guide to Legal Protections for Corporate Employees

Synopsis

"Whistleblower Law is the first book to explain and analyze the impact and implications of this legislation, especially as it pertains to the rights of whistleblowers - those who dare to come forward with evidence of wrongdoing. Written by the leading experts in the field, and drawn from their extensive experience in advising law-makers, arguing cases, and training professionals, Whistleblower Law covers all technical and practical aspects of this groundbreaking legislation. Written in language that will appeal to anyone concerned with the rights and responsibilities of whistleblowers in an age of corporate scrutiny, Whistleblower Law will become the standard reference for lawyers, judges, and mediators; corporate executives and managers; employees of publicly traded companies; professors and students of corporate law; labor leaders and human resource advocates; and potential whistleblower alike." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

On July 30, 2002, as a direct result of the national and international corporate scandals that shocked the investor community and the general public, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act was enacted into law. When he signed the bill, President George Bush characterized the Sarbanes-Oxley Act as "the most far reaching reform of American business practices since the time of Franklin Delano Roosevelt." This sentiment was also echoed in Congress during the final debate on the Wall Street reform law. For example, Senator Mike Enzi (R-WY) described the reform law as "earthshaking" when he urged his follow members of Congress to support the law: "It had to be earthshaking because we are trying to counteract the tremors from the volcanic action of the mountaintop being blown off such companies as Enron, WorldCom, Global Crossing, and others."

The Act was one of the most comprehensive reforms of Wall Street investment practices ever passed by Congress. The law was a direct response to the financial collapse of two major multinational corporations, Enron and WorldCom, and a reaction to the "fraud and greed" that was blamed for these failures. Congress intended that the law would "play a crucial role in restoring trust in the financial markets" by ensuring that "corporate fraud and greed" would be "better detected, prevented and prosecuted. . . ."

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