The Chronicle of Ireland - Vol. 1

The Chronicle of Ireland - Vol. 1

The Chronicle of Ireland - Vol. 1

The Chronicle of Ireland - Vol. 1

Excerpt

This translation aims to present the evidence for the Chronicle of Ireland — a chronicle which does not itself exist but survives in large part in a range of daughter-chronicles. The latter continued beyond the date at which the parent text came to an end, 911. Much of the Chronicle of Ireland can be reconstructed with a high degree of probability, but there are other entries which may well have belonged to the parent chronicle, and yet others which probably did not. The layout of this translation has been chosen to facilitate the task of discriminating between these different elements. For example, the main reason for accepting the fundamental notion that there was a single chronicle running from 432 up to 911 is that so many entries under individual years occur in the same sequence and in the same wording in the daughtertexts. Admittedly, there are occasional disturbances to the sequence and also to the wording, but these are relatively few and insignificant compared with the bulk of shared material.

The entries which can confidently be attributed to the Chronicle of Ireland constitute, in their sequence and in their wording, the basis on which scholars can first accept that it existed, and, secondly, establish its character. This translation, however, also includes annalistic material in the main daughterchronicles for which there is no obvious way to establish that they belonged to the parent-text, and even material where there are good reasons to believe that it did not. The main reason for choosing to include this further material is that much of it may well have belonged to the Chronicle of Ireland; as for how much belonged to the parent-chronicle, the student of early Irish history must make his own judgements. There was, however, a second reason in favour of inclusiveness: the Chronicle of Ireland, as preserved in its daughterchronicles, constitutes the principal narrative source for early Irish history; and yet some of the daughter-chronicles contain information probably recorded close to the event which derived from sources other than the

1 In AU obits are sometimes collected together in a single, and usually initial, entry, when
the other chronicles do not follow this path, for example, 661.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.