Creating an Environment for Successful Projects

Creating an Environment for Successful Projects

Creating an Environment for Successful Projects

Creating an Environment for Successful Projects

Synopsis

Since it was first published in 1997, Creating an Environment for Successful Projects has become a landmark work that shows how to develop project management as an organizational practice. This second edition offers solid, results-oriented advice on how upper management can create an environment that supports the success of special projects and the development of new products. The book also includes a wealth of examples from the authors' workshop participants and readers of the first edition who have successfully implemented these concepts within their organizations. New in the second edition:
  • Ideas and practices about portfolio management to achieve greater overall success from a portfolio of projects
  • Advice for helping project teams come together to become more effective
  • Information for developing the chief project officer
  • Suggestions for implementing project management information systems
  • More descriptions about organizations and people who have used these principles to develop vastly improved environments

Excerpt

When Robert Graham and Randall Englund asked me to write the Foreword for the second edition of this book, it provided me an opportunity to revisit where Chevron was in 1997, when the first edition was published, and assess where ChevronTexaco is today in our post-merger environment (Chevron Corporation and Texaco Corporation merged to form ChevronTexaco Corporation in 2001). I would like to start by setting the context for my first reading of Creating an Environment for Successful Projects.

In the early 1990s, the oil industry had embarked on the development of project processes along with the supporting tools and techniques. We had found an inconsistency in how our projects were being managed and the associated outcomes. As a result, many companies, including Chevron, adopted standard project management processes during this time period. With the endorsement of our senior management, we were able to deploy a standard process that has been recognized as a best practice within our industry. In the first edition of this book, Graham and Englund refer to this as “designing a project management system that is known and trusted.”

In 1997, Chevron had been deploying our project process for four years and had just created a new organization primarily responsible for project management. As part of the dedicated project organization, we were particularly interested in the work being done by Graham and Englund and others about the environment for project management.

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