Raising a Moody Child: How to Cope with Depression and Bipolar Disorder

Raising a Moody Child: How to Cope with Depression and Bipolar Disorder

Raising a Moody Child: How to Cope with Depression and Bipolar Disorder

Raising a Moody Child: How to Cope with Depression and Bipolar Disorder

Synopsis

"Dr. Mary Fristad and Dr. Jill Goldberg Arnold have guided hundreds of families through the difficult journey of evaluating children for depression and bipolar disorder and finding treatments that really work. These trusted child psychologists know the pain kids endure when moodiness gets out of control and the frustration of parents at their wits' end. Now Dr. Fristad and Dr. Goldberg Arnold translate their decades of successful research and therapeutic work into a detailed roadmap for teaching your moody child to get along better in the world. Loads of realistic examples bring to life the many faces of mood problems and illustrate step-by-step strategies." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

Parenting a child with a mood disorder—or, for that matter, being the child with a mood disorder—can be lonely, frightening, infuriating, heart wrenching, and overwhelming. Whether your child was diagnosed with depression or bipolar disorder two years ago or two weeks ago, or whether you're not yet sure what's wrong, you may be coming to this book exhausted and frustrated. We hope this book will guide you to new strategies for coping and help you navigate the important pathway to developing a local treatment team to work with you and your child. If your child has not yet been diagnosed, we hope our advice for getting an expert evaluation will make that critical first step productive.

Daily, we work with families, perhaps just like yours, to help parents understand what is going on with their mood-disordered child and to help the child or teenager understand as well. In the following pages we share the ideas, information, and tools that we offer to families every day in clinical practice and research. Our experience in working with hundreds of families has taught us that parents (and children) who believe they can improve their situation do improve. If this book can provide you with new hope, ease some of your frustration, and diminish any of the pain of living with a mood disorder, we will be satisfied that this job has been well done.

We were moved to write this book by thirty years of collective experience in working with families dealing with affective disorders. I (M. A. F.) began to read with great excitement in the early 1990s about expressed emotion and psychoeducation—that is, psychiatric patient and family education—first for adults with schizophrenia, then for those with mood disorders. Psychoeducation gave a name to the sort of therapy I had concocted for my work with affectively ill children and their parents . . .

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