Bipolar Disorder in Childhood and Early Adolescence

Bipolar Disorder in Childhood and Early Adolescence

Bipolar Disorder in Childhood and Early Adolescence

Bipolar Disorder in Childhood and Early Adolescence

Synopsis

This volume provides a state-of-the-science review of knowledge on bipolar disorder in children, covering all aspects of theory and research. Leading clinical researchers address such topics as epidemiology, diagnosis and assessment, comorbidity, and outcomes. Compelling findings are presented on the neurobiological and genetic bases of the disorder. Throughout, contributors identify promising directions for further investigation while weighing in on key methodological questions and areas of controversy.

Excerpt

Although the existence and diagnostic boundary of childhood bipolar disorder has been the focus of substantial controversy (see Chapter 2, this volume), there is evidence of a progressively growing consensus on both the existence of child mania and on the vicissitudes of age-specific research in this area (National Institute of Mental Health Research Roundtable on Prepubertal Bipolar Disorder, 2001; hereafter cited as NIMH Roundtable, 2001). The growing interest in this area has been demonstrated by the increasing number of federally funded projects on bipolar disorder in children and by the diverse areas these projects cover, including phenomenology, natural history, family studies, offspring, epidemiology, neuroimaging, treatment, and preclinical studies, as outlined in the NIMH Roundtable (2001). This book attempts to provide state-of-the-art understanding in the domains of epidemiology, diagnosis and natural history, neurobiology and genetics, and treatment.

WHY CONCEPTUALIZE CHILD AND EARLY
ADOLESCENT BIPOLAR DISORDER?

As noted in the NIMH Roundtable (2001), regardless of the phenotype (conservative DSM-IV vs. broadly defined bipolar disorder not otherwise specified), there is agreement that prepubertal bipolar disorder is a chronic, mixed manic, continuously cycling disorder. Furthermore, the diagnostic and natural history similarity of prepubertal bipolar disorder to early adolescent bipolar disorder has been reported by Geller and colleagues (see . . .

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