Child Abuse and Neglect: The School's Response

Child Abuse and Neglect: The School's Response

Child Abuse and Neglect: The School's Response

Child Abuse and Neglect: The School's Response

Synopsis

"Abuse and neglect affect thousands of children every year, with potentially devastating consequences for victims, their families, and society as a whole. As the primary adults with whom children come into contact outside the home, school professionals have a unique opportunity - and responsibility - to identify maltreatment and respond effectively. This guide provides a succinct review of current knowledge on child maltreatment and links it specifically to practical applications in the schools. Illustrated throughout with clearly written, realistic case examples, the book will be equally valuable to practitioners, those involved in training and program development, and students preparing to enter the field." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

Child maltreatment has finally been recognized as one of society's most insidious problems. Child abuse and neglect, previously [taboo] subjects, have received markedly increased public and professional attention in recent decades. Clinicians report treating scores of victimized, often traumatized, children and their families. Researchers confirm alarming incidence and prevalence rates, serious consequences, and widespread adverse risk factors. Specialized professional organizations and conventions have been established; focused journals have been developed; a rapidly growing literature has emerged. All of these efforts have increased the knowledge base and helped to inform the practice of psychologists, counselors, social workers, and other mental health professionals working in the field of child maltreatment.

Schools, too, have been asked to respond. By the 1980s schools were recognized as [the major social institution concerned with the development of children.] Therefore, it was argued, they should [assume a major responsibility in facilitating, reporting, and participating in the delivery of services to the abused] (Volpe, 1980, p. 3). Given their extensive out-of-home contact with students, school professionals do have a unique opportunity to identify and respond to child maltreatment (Horton, 1995; James & Burch, 1999 O'Toole, Webster, O'Toole, & Lucal, 1999; Tite, 1994 Tharinger & Vevier, 1987). Additionally, because of their expertise in child development, family systems, assessment, counseling, and consultation, school psychologists and school counselors, in particular, have been called upon to be involved in the school's response to child abuse and neglect (James & Burch, 1999 Vevier & Tharinger, 1986). There is evidence that many have tried to accept the challenge and be more involved (Tharinger, Russian, & Robinson, 1989).

In recent years, however, concerns have shifted to youth violence and school violence in particular, as alarming stories of school shootings have repeatedly shocked the nation (Garbarino, 1999). Schools are being asked to . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.