Depression and Women: An Integrative Treatment Approach

Depression and Women: An Integrative Treatment Approach

Depression and Women: An Integrative Treatment Approach

Depression and Women: An Integrative Treatment Approach

Synopsis

In her newest book, Simonds presents ""Integrative Relational Therapy,"" her unique nonpathologizing approach to psychotherapy with depressed women. IRT integrates empirically-supported therapies, feminist theories of depression, creative arts therapies, and mindfulness-based techniques into a cohesive model that addresses the gender and cultural factors contributing to women's depression. The book also addresses relapse prevention, reproductive-related events, special medication issues for women, and the latest research on alternative remedies. A unique feature of the book includes three conceptual maps that guide the therapist throughout the course of therapy, weaving a common thread while allowing for the individuality of each client. A list of integrative resources and recommended readings in feminist therapy, alternative therapies, and holistic approaches to the treatment of depression, anxiety, and women's reproductive-related events are also included.

Excerpt

This book was born in a moment of frustration during a meeting with a graduate student therapist whom I was supervising. We were talking about a client the trainee had just seen in therapy, a young woman who was depressed. The trainee was struggling to come up with a case conceptualization and treatment plan. She asked me the inevitable question that graduate students often ask in supervision: [Can you tell me if there is a book I can read?] After giving her a list of six books, I realized I had synthesized these readings into one comprehensive approach to psychotherapy with women who were suffering from depression. Knowing full well that most graduate students will not have the time to read six books, I decided to write one integrative book.

This book describes a model that I have been using for the past several years, which I call Integrative Relational Therapy (IRT). The model's integrationist, contextual, and relational perspective arose from my many years of viewing clients through the lens of trauma theory which, at its best, incorporates such an approach (Briere, 1989; Courtois, 1988, 1999; Herman, 1992; McCann & Pearlman, 1990; Pearlman & Saakvitne, 1995). In particular, I have been influenced by Constructivist Self-Development Theory (McCann 8c Pearlman, 1990; Pearlman & Saakvitne, 1995), the feminist relational writings from the Stone Center (Jordan, 1997; Jordan, Kaplan, Miller, Stiver, & Surrey, 1991; Miller, 1976; Miller & Stiver, 1997), silencing the self theory of women's depression (Jack, 1987, 1991, 1999), and research on women's adult development (Apter, 1995; Josselson, 1996).

This book builds on my previous work, Bridging the Silence: Nonverbal Modalities in the Treatment of Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse (Simonds, 1994). In addition, my efforts here reflect a synthesis of 30 years of adult learning beginning with a Bachelor of Arts in Chinese language and literature, and extending to over 20 years of experience as a psychotherapist. During that time I have integrated my training in clinical psychology, dance/movement therapy and creative arts therapies, community activism, welfare rights advocacy, feminist activism, feminist therapy, and alternative therapies.

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