Antisocial Personality Disorder: A Practitioner's Guide to Comparative Treatments

Antisocial Personality Disorder: A Practitioner's Guide to Comparative Treatments

Antisocial Personality Disorder: A Practitioner's Guide to Comparative Treatments

Antisocial Personality Disorder: A Practitioner's Guide to Comparative Treatments

Synopsis

Patients with antisocial personality disorder (APD) have traditionally been considered difficult ot treat, or even untreatable, with psychotherapy. Recent clinical and research developments, however, have begun to change this view. In this book. both experienced and novice clinicians will gain an understanding of the developments in this area of psychotherapy. Rotgers and Maniacci present experts in the field of various models of treatment, among them Adlerian, biosocial-learning, motivational interviewing, Rogerian and psychopharmacological, to identify treatment goals, select assessment tools, conceptualize progression, pinpoint pitfalls, develop techniques, and move toward a successful therapeutic completion. By providing a brief overview of APD, discussing the ongoing controversies regarding the construct of APD, and assessing the responses to the same set of questions posed to each expert, the authors offers a glimpse into the difficult world of antisocial personality disorder.

Excerpt

The therapy of patients with disorders of character or personality has been discussed in the clinical literature since the beginning of the recorded history of psychotherapy. Literature on the psychotherapeutic treatment of specific personality disorders has emerged more recently and is growing quickly. The main theoretical orientation in the psychotherapeutic literature on treatment of personality disorders has been psychoanalytic (e.g., Kernberg, 1975; Masterson, 1978; Reid, 1978). Psychoanalytic writers have produced a rich literature on treatment of these patients for more than 30 years.

More recently, cognitive behavioral therapists (e.g., Beck & Freeman, 1990; Young, 1994) have offered a cognitive behavioral treatment approach. Despite the literature in this area, there have been few opportunities for a comparison and integration of extant models. Very often, writers end up [preaching to the converted] in that those therapists who are psychodynamically oriented tend to read the psychodynamic literature just as cognitive and behavioral therapists stick to their own literature. Cross fertilization of approaches is thereby stymied.

Probably no single diagnostic group engenders as much concern, consternation, and fear among therapists as does Antisocial Personality Disorder (APD). This concern and attention stems from the fact that these patients usually require more time in treatment (when they come), more energy on the . . .

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