Teaching Cultural Competence in Nursing and Health Care: Inquiry, Action, and Innovation

Teaching Cultural Competence in Nursing and Health Care: Inquiry, Action, and Innovation

Teaching Cultural Competence in Nursing and Health Care: Inquiry, Action, and Innovation

Teaching Cultural Competence in Nursing and Health Care: Inquiry, Action, and Innovation

Synopsis

Teaching Cultural Competence is intended as a primary resource for educators and graduate students in academic settings, health care institutions, and professional associations. The only book that presents a research-supported conceptual model and a valid, reliable corresponding questionnaire to guide educational strategy design, implementation, and evaluation, it provides readers with valuable tools and strategies for cultural competence education that can easily be adapted by educators at all levels.

Excerpt

Preparing nurses and other health professionals to provide quality health care in the increasingly multicultural and global society of the 21st century requires a new, comprehensive approach that emphasizes cultural competence education throughout professional education and professional life. Teaching Cultural Competence in Nursing and Health Care aims to address this need and provide readers with valuable tools and strategies for cultural competence education at all levels.

Culture is a factor that can make the greatest difference in promoting Wellness, preventing illness, restoring health, facilitating coping, and enhancing quality of life for all individuals, families, and communities. The two major goals of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services report Healthy People 2010 require culture-specific care. The first goal—to increase quality and years of healthy life for all—can only be achieved when examining [quality of life] and the meaning of [health and well-being] within a cultural context. The second goal seeks to eliminate health disparities among different segments of the population, necessitating culture-specific and competent actions designed to eliminate disparities (Jeffreys, 2005b). Therefore, customized health care that fits the client's cultural values, beliefs, and traditions (culturally congruent care) is urgently imperative (Leininger, 2002a, 2002b).

Culturally congruent health care is a basic human right, not a privilege, and therefore every human should be entitled to it. The International Council of Nurses (ICN) Code for Nurses (ICN, 1973), the American Nurses Association (ANA) Code of Ethics (ANA, 2001), and the National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in Health Care (Office of Minority Health, 2001) are several important documents that serve as reminders. Criteria within accreditation and credentialing agencies such as the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, the National Committee on Quality . . .

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