Comparative Treatments for Borderline Personality Disorder

Comparative Treatments for Borderline Personality Disorder

Comparative Treatments for Borderline Personality Disorder

Comparative Treatments for Borderline Personality Disorder

Synopsis

"Borderline personality disorder presents a challenge to most experienced therapists. Utilizing one specific case study, experts apply a variety of modalities to identify treatment goals, select assessment tools, conceptualize progression, pinpoint pitfalls, develop techniques, and move toward a successful therapeutic completion." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

Arthur Freeman, Mark Stone, Donna Martin, and Mark Reinecke

Words and phrases sometimes acquire an emotional charge or associated meaning and therefore come to represent something different than their original or intended meaning. For example, the terms idiot, imbecile, and moron were not originally pejorative terms but were legitimate clinical diagnostic terms for levels of intellectual ability.

Clinical psychology has been a fertile breeding ground for such terms. Personality disorder has come to have a pejorative meaning, and within that broad rubric, few categories seem to strike as much fear into the hearts of clinicians as does the term borderline personality disorder. Merely mentioning to a fellow clinician that your new padent is a borderline virtually guarantees a sigh of knowing sympathy, even absent any addidonal details. Yet because borderline is an emotionally charged term, it may lead to a less-than-accurate view of the situation. Clinicians will most likely picture a patient, probably a woman, who is erratic, unreasonably demanding, impulsive, self-injurious, relationship-needy, yet relationship-aversive. Beyond its meaning in diagnosis, the term borderline implies a syndrome, a level of functioning, a dynamic constellation, a prognostic statement, and an insult and accusation. When a patient is difficult to treat, sometimes psychotic, resistant, unstable, or insulting to the therapist, the term borderline, accurate or not, comes to mind.

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