Hans Urs von Balthasar and the Dramatic Structure of Truth: A Philosophical Investigation

Hans Urs von Balthasar and the Dramatic Structure of Truth: A Philosophical Investigation

Hans Urs von Balthasar and the Dramatic Structure of Truth: A Philosophical Investigation

Hans Urs von Balthasar and the Dramatic Structure of Truth: A Philosophical Investigation

Synopsis

Hans Urs von Balthasar (19051988) was one of the most prolific and influential theologians of the twentieth century. This book, the first English-language study of Balthasar, seeks to show the fruitfulness of his thought by drawing out its philosophical implications for the question of truth. D. C. Schindler argues that a "dramatic" approach, shaping both the form and content of philosophy, enables a new conception of being, of human consciousness, and of their coming together to satisfy both traditional concerns about unity and postmodern calls for difference-while avoiding the pitfalls of a one-sided emphasis on either.

Excerpt

This book aims to develop a dramatic concept of truth using the resources of the thought of the Swiss Catholic theologian and philosopher Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905–88), in dialogue with nineteenth- and twentieth-century Continental philosophy. The concern that forms the background of my study is the one that has occupied much of contemporary Continental thought, namely, the desire to overcome what is often called today a "metaphysics of presence," that is, a reduction of the object of knowledge to its immediacy to the knower, or, in other contexts, "identitarianism," that is, the privileging of identity over difference in relation. This desire is connected—particularly in response to Edmund Husserl—with an attack on efforts to provide an absolute foundation for knowledge, under the assumption that because knowledge is essentially "egocentric," such a foundation entails a kind of tyranny of human subjectivity, the mastery of the human subject over the world.

Driving this concern is the need to safeguard a genuine and abiding difference in the truth relation. And yet, in addressing this concern, many philosophies of the past two centuries have taken for granted, to varying degrees of explicitness and often unwittingly, the "identitarian" model of truth that lies at the heart of the problem. Rather than develop a more

1. In other words, its unmediated identity with the knower, an identity exclusive
of any mediation.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.