Styles of Piety: Practicing Philosophy after the Death of God

Styles of Piety: Practicing Philosophy after the Death of God

Styles of Piety: Practicing Philosophy after the Death of God

Styles of Piety: Practicing Philosophy after the Death of God

Excerpt

Styles of Piety explores questions of value in light of the problem of nihilism articulated in Nietzsche's pronouncement of the death of God. With the accomplishment of a thoroughly rationalized world, the categories that had promised to give meaning to experience proved untenable. The problem of the irrational appeared to be immanent to reason rather than merely an aberration from its proper functions, the aspirations of philosophy appeared to be inherently contradictory, and its ideals seemed to harbor coercive deceptions and tyrannies. Nevertheless, philosophers since Nietzsche have continued to pursue questions of value; indeed, they have found new avenues to address the problems conventional to philosophy within this crisis itself by exploring the concrete conditions that qualify reason rather than dogmatically defending its pretense to self-transparency. Philosophy's project has developed as a critical turn against its own abstract ideals. And yet, paradoxically, this immanent critique of philosophy simultaneously serves as a defense of the problems of value conventional to it. In this way, the problem of piety defines the fault line along which philosophers now tread. They work critically to deconstruct philosophy's pieties, but in the name of those same values to which philosophers have been so devoted. "Piety" names both the dogmatism they seek to avoid and the spirit in which they continue to work. How, we ask, are these contradictions to be best negotiated?

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.