New Thoughts on the Black Arts Movement

New Thoughts on the Black Arts Movement

New Thoughts on the Black Arts Movement

New Thoughts on the Black Arts Movement

Synopsis

During the 1960s and 1970s, a cadre of poets, playwrights, visual artists, musicians, and other visionaries came together to create a renaissance in African American literature and art. This charged chapter in the history of African American culture-which came to be known as the Black Arts Movement-has remained largely neglected by subsequent generations of critics. New Thoughts on the Black Arts Movement includes essays that reexamine well-known figures such as Amiri Baraka, Larry Neal, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sonia Sanchez, Betye Saar, Jeff Donaldson, and Haki Madhubuti. In addition, the anthology expands the scope of the movement by offering essays that explore the racial and sexual politics of the era, links with other period cultural movements, the arts in prison, the role of Black colleges and universities, gender politics and the rise of feminism, color fetishism, photography, music, and more. An invigorating look at a movement that has long begged for reexamination, this collection lucidly interprets the complex debates that surround this tumultuous era and demonstrates that the celebration of this movement need not be separated from its critique.

Excerpt

Harlem (1964), Brooklyn (1964), Philadelphia (1964), Watts (1965), Chicago (1966), Cleveland (1966), San Francisco (1967), Tampa (1967), Cincinnati (1967), Atlanta (1967), Boston (1967), Milwaukee (1967), Newark (1967), Detroit (1967), Baltimore (1968), Kansas City (1968), Chicago (1968), Pittsburgh (1968), Washington, D.C. (1968).

On July 29, 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson issued Executive Order 11365 establishing a National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders to investigate the explosion of "racial disorders" in American cities. President Johnson's mandate for the eleven-member appointed commission was to answer three crucial questions about the recent upsurge in urban violence: "What happened? Why did it happen? And what can be done to prevent it from happening again?" After conducting extensive field research, hearings, surveys, and interviews, the bipartisan commission published its detailed findings in a hefty government document known as "The Kerner Report." Released on March 1, 1968, the 425-page report was informally named for the commission's chairman Governor Otto Kerner of Illinois.

Focused on 1967, the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders found that over 120 U.S. cities had reported disturbances in "minority" neighborhoods—especially in predominantly African American communities—during the first nine months of the year (fig. I. 1). Ranging from minor disturbances such as broken windows to major outbursts that included arson, looting, and sniping, these disturbances—which were typically fueled by real and perceived crimes of discriminatory or abusive police actions—reached a peak in July 1967. Newark and Detroit were the sites of the most explosive violence.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.