The Multiple Intelligences of Reading and Writing: Making the Words Come Alive

The Multiple Intelligences of Reading and Writing: Making the Words Come Alive

The Multiple Intelligences of Reading and Writing: Making the Words Come Alive

The Multiple Intelligences of Reading and Writing: Making the Words Come Alive

Synopsis

The Multiple Intelligences of Reading and Writing: Making the Words Come Alive We normally think of reading and writing as skills that are a part of linguistic intelligence. In The Multiple Intelligences of Reading and Writing: Making the Words Come Alive, Thomas Armstrong shows how involving the other seven intelligences'logical-mathematical, spatial, bodily-kinesthetic, musical, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and naturalistic'will help students acquire reading and writing skills, especially those students who are not particularly strong in linguistic intelligence. The Multiple Intelligences of Reading and Writing appeals to all educators who work with reading and writing skills, from the preschool teacher leading the class in phonemic awareness activities to the post-graduate professor helping students examine kinesthetic imagery in Shakespeare's plays. The book combines Howard Gardner's MI theory and recent brain research on reading and writing with historical, anthropological, biographical, and psychological perspectives on literacy. Armstrong pulls the research together to show you how to engage students by infusing the study of words with imagery, logic, oral language, physical activity, emotion, music, social involvement, and nature experiences. Armstrong provides hundreds of ideas, strategies, tips, and resources for teaching everything from grammar and spelling to word decoding and reading comprehension. His nuts-and-bolts, strategy-focused approach bridges the best reading and writing methods for application in preK?12 regular and special education classrooms, literacy programs, speech and language pathology groups, one-to-one tutoring sessions, and all other settings where words are the focus of learning. Armstrong shows you how to empower your students with literacy skills for life.

Excerpt

This book has its origins in two separate but related issues in my life, one a joyful personal experience and the other a professional conundrum. First, let me speak of the joyful experience. About five years ago, I happened to be watching a videotape of the Al Pacino film Looking for Richard. In this picture, which is part documentary and part Shakespearean performance, Pacino takes the viewer through the various stages of putting on the play Richard III. We see the actors meeting to discuss roles, we hear interviews with people on the street concerning their feelings about Shakespeare, we see Pacino himself commenting on the play and its history, and we get, of course, several scenes from the play itself. Seeing this picture was a kind of miraculous turning point for me in my intellectual life. Before this, I had not been much of a reader since college 25 years earlier.

Just to give you a sense of where I was at with literacy, when I was a teacher in the public school system I remember taking some courses for the purpose of obtaining a salary increment, but I was so lazy or so “a-literate” (able to read but choosing not to) that I read the Cliffs Notes instead of the actual texts. After seeing Looking for Richard, however, I started to read Shakespeare's plays. I read the mass-market paperback versions put out by the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C. I liked them because they put the explanations of difficult words and phrases on the facing page instead of in footnotes at the bottom of the page (this arrangement prevented me from getting dizzy or headachy through moving my head up and down all the time). I devoured most of the plays in a matter of months. I loved them!

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