The Portfolio Organizer: Succeeding with Portfolios in Your Classroom

The Portfolio Organizer: Succeeding with Portfolios in Your Classroom

The Portfolio Organizer: Succeeding with Portfolios in Your Classroom

The Portfolio Organizer: Succeeding with Portfolios in Your Classroom

Synopsis

The theory of multiple intelligences -- The New City School journey -- Collegiality : learning and growing together -- Assessing and reporting student growth -- Creative routes to MI -- The importance of the personals -- The phases of MI implementation -- Supporting teacher growth with leadership -- What's next? The future of MI.

Excerpt

In the age of accountability and the improvement of student learning, a new and powerful set of skills has come on the scene. We call it [assessment literacy] (Hargreaves & Fullan, 1998). Assessment literacy refers to the capacity of teachers (individually, but especially together) to (1) examine and critically understand achievement and performance data concerning student learning outcomes, (2) develop classroom and school improvement plans based on the data, and directed at improving results, and (3) use their political ability to participate in local debates about the uses and misuses of achievement data in order to be positively influential in using accountability for learning and improvement.

There is a paucity of good literature on the topic of assessment literacy. The Portfolio Organizer stands out as a superb contribution to the vital field of accountability for learning. This book is distinguished by the presence and integration of a conceptual framework and a superb array of practical examples. Nearly every key issue is anticipated and addressed in this accessible and clear treatment of a complex topic. The purposes and audience are carefully presented along with corresponding descriptions of samples, sharing of learning, evaluation and grading, and using portfolios for professional development as well as for improving student performance.

The authors have been immersed in pioneering work on portfolios for a decade. They have developed their ideas through work with their own students and through a wide range of research and evaluation projects including new initiatives involving elementary and secondary school students, initial preparation of teachers, and continuous professional development of teachers and administrators. They have learned by grappling with the complex issues of introducing evaluation that simultaneously serves improvement and accountability goals.

The result is a great practical book that can help educators develop their understanding and use of portfolios as a route to reform.

—MICHAEL FULLAN

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