How to Help Beginning Teachers Succeed

How to Help Beginning Teachers Succeed

How to Help Beginning Teachers Succeed

How to Help Beginning Teachers Succeed

Synopsis

The problem : unforeseen difficulties -- The solution : a beginning teacher assistance program -- Developing an assistance program -- Mentors -- Needs assessment -- Forms of initial assistance -- Forms of ongoing assistance -- Summative program evaluation.

Excerpt

I sat by the same person every single day at lunch, and I never really
talked to him. He wouldn't even say hello to me. Sometimes I would walk
into the faculty lounge, and it was just like there was a wall between me
and the older teachers.

—A BEGINNING TEACHER

In the coming year, thousands of college graduates will enter the nation's classrooms to begin their teaching careers. Most of these teachers will have received high grades in their teaching methods courses and student teaching experiences. Most will have a genuine affection for young people and will be committed to making a difference in the lives of their students. Despite the good intentions and high expectations of these beginners, 40 to 50 percent of them will drop out of teaching within the first seven years (New Mexico State Department of Education, 1988; Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 1984; Thomas & Kiley, 1994), most within the first two years (Schlechty & Vance, 1983). Of those who survive, many will have such negative initial experiences that they may never reach their full potential as educators (Romatowski, Dorminey, & Voorhees, 1989; Huling-Austin, 1986).

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