The Ethical Teacher

The Ethical Teacher

The Ethical Teacher

The Ethical Teacher

Synopsis

The Ethical Teacher combines empirical expressions of teachers' beliefs and practices with a theoretical discussion of the connections between the moral dimensions of schooling and applied professional ethics in teaching from its own perspective of ethical knowledge./par0/par0/• Ethical knowledge relies on the teacher's awareness, understanding, and acceptance of the demands of moral agency as professional expectations implicit in all aspects of daily practice.
• Ethical knowledge, as the foundation of a principle-based ethic of individual and collective practice must be brought to the forefront of our thinking about teaching.
• Ethical knowledge is compromised by moral dilemmas and complexities that routinely challenge teachers.
• In making ethical knowledge more visible, such tensions may be assuaged, and three avenues of renewal may be enabled: a renewed sense of teacher professionalism, renewed school cultures, and renewed teacher education and professional learning./par0/The organizational structure of the book into three parts and eight chapters presents the concept of ethical knowledge as it is revealed, as it is challenged, and as it may be used in schools. The Ethical Teacher is for teachers and teacher educators and for those who conduct research about their worlds.

Excerpt

Teaching today is increasingly complex work, requiring the highest standards of professional practice to perform it well (Hargreaves and Goodson 1996). It is the core profession, the key agent of change in today's knowledge society. Teachers are the midwives of that knowledge society. Without them, or their competence, the future will be malformed and stillborn. In the United States, George W. Bush's educational slogan has been to leave no child behind. What is clear today in general, and in this book in particular, is that leaving no child behind means leaving no teacher or leader behind either. Yet, teaching too is also in crisis, staring tragedy in the face. There is a demographic exodus occurring in the profession as many teachers in the ageing cohort of the Boomer generation are retiring early because of stress, burnout or disillusionment with the impact of years of mandated reform on their lives and work. After a decade of relentless reform in a climate of shaming and blaming teachers for perpetuating poor standards, the attractiveness of teaching as a profession has faded fast among potential new recruits.

Teaching has to compete much harder against other professions for high calibre candidates than it did in the last period of mass recruitment, when able women were led to feel that only nursing and secretarial work were viable options. Teaching may not yet have reverted to being an occupation for 'unmarriageable women and unsaleable men' as Willard Waller described it in 1932, but many American inner cities now run their school systems on high numbers of uncertified teachers. The teacher recruitment crisis in England has led some schools to move to a four-day week; more and more schools are run on the increasingly casualized labour of temporary teachers from overseas, or endless supply teachers whose quality busy . . .

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