Quality of Life and Older People

Quality of Life and Older People

Quality of Life and Older People

Quality of Life and Older People

Synopsis

Quality of life and older people reviews the way that older people talk about their quality of life and how this differs from the ways that younger people, researchers and scientists, policy makers and professionals discuss it. The book challenges the traditional approaches to the meaning and measurement of quality of life in older people by placing older people's accounts at the centre. It draws on a range of behavioural and social science knowledge to present a new way of thinking and understanding about quality of life and older people.

Excerpt

Quality of Life by John Bond and Lynne Corner is the nineteenth book to be published so far in the Rethinking Ageing series and it seems appropriate to locate it in the context of what has been achieved so far. The series was planned in the early 1990s, following the rapid growth in ageing populations in Britain and other countries that led to a dramatic increase in academic and professional interest in gerontology. In the 1970s and 1980s there was a steady increase in the publication of research studies which attempted to define and describe the characteristics and needs of older people. There were also a small number of theoretical attempts to reconceptualize the meaning of old age and to explore new ways in which we could think about ageing. By the early 1990s, however, a palpable gap had emerged between what was known about ageing by gerontologists and the very limited amount of information which was readily available to the growing number of people with a professional or personal interest in old age. The Rethinking Ageing series was conceived as a response to that 'knowledge gap'.

The first book to be published in the new series was Age, Race and Ethnicity by Ken Blakemore and Margaret Boneham. In the series editor's preface I set out the main aim of the Rethinking Ageing series which was to focus on a topic of current concern or interest in ageing (ageism, elder abuse, health in later life, dementia etc.) by addressing two fundamental questions: what is known about this topic? And what are the policy and practice implications of this knowledge? We wanted authors to provide a readable and stimulating review of current knowledge, but also to rethink their subject area by developing their own ideas in the light of their particular research and experience. We also believed it was essential that the books should be both scholarly and written in clear, non-technical language that would appeal equally to a broad range of students, academics and professionals with a common interest in ageing and age care.

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