Learning from Research: Getting More from Your Data

Learning from Research: Getting More from Your Data

Learning from Research: Getting More from Your Data

Learning from Research: Getting More from Your Data

Synopsis

• How do I begin to plan my research?

• How can I be sure that I am collecting useful data and analysing it appropriately?

• Do I need a sophisticated understanding of statistics in order to carry out high quality research?

If these are questions which concern you, then you will find great support in this reassuring and down to earth book. It tells the story of five postgraduate researchers on their journey to successful completion of Master of Education or PhD degrees. Four of the five were new to research, had demanding full time jobs and so were researching part time - and at a distance. All four undertook quantitative studies and even though two of them claimed to be 'afraid of stats' at the beginning, they all succeeded in producing quality theses. The fifth researcher had previous relevant research experience and had an award which enabled her to carry out a full time qualitative investigation at doctoral level. All five faced sharp learning curves at various times but they learnt from their experiences, as we all do. They discuss very openly some of the mistakes they made, the lessons they learnt and, with hindsight, how they might have done things differently.

A comprehensive glossary, key quotations in boxes and detailed annotated further reading combined with a straightforward writing style make this an invaluable text for any researcher.

Excerpt

This book is an account of the experiences of five postgraduate research students, Helen, Gilbert, Cher Ping, Jan and Tim on their journeys to successful completion of Master of Education or PhD degrees. They share a number of characteristics, not least the fact that they all had a formidable capacity for hard work, a determination to succeed and to reach the standard required for the award of their degree in the required timescale. They knew the research would involve a major commitment of time and, in most cases, money but had decided they were prepared to commit themselves to the work in order to be able to explore their topics, which were of importance to them personally and professionally.

Their preparation for the research was admirable. They spent time locating, studying and analysing the published literature relating to their topic, wrote up as much as they could as they went along and spent what must have seemed to them to be an inordinate amount of time refining research questions, objectives and hypotheses. They tried out their ideas with colleagues, students and supervisory tutors and their data-collecting instruments went through many drafts before they were satisfied. They did not get everything right all the time but they made real efforts to eliminate faulty design and unsatisfactory wording.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.