Reading, Writing and Reasoning: A Guide for Students

Reading, Writing and Reasoning: A Guide for Students

Reading, Writing and Reasoning: A Guide for Students

Reading, Writing and Reasoning: A Guide for Students

Synopsis

Review of 1st Edition The book's title is absolutely accurate in describing how the authors give the most practical and clear advice on all of the problematic aspects of reading for meaning, developing analytic and coherent thinking and writing in coursework. This book will be invaluable for any student and it would be sad if most are too busy writing essays and undertaking examinations to read it. Nursing Times Review of this edition I felt this was a real back to basics text in parts that went over some rules of thumb that even I'd forgotten about. I felt also that part 3 entered the domain of some of the more technical arguments when discussing thought processes. The sub-heading 'Criticizing others is not a blood sport' resonated oh so true. A thoroughly worthwhile and enjoyable text. John Carson, Senior Lecturer, Northumbria University. This guide is a must for all students who find writing essays difficult. It will enable them to develop essential skills in reading, writing and reasoning. The authors are both very experienced in helping students to develop proficiency in these areas. Written in plain language, the book encourages the development of key skills in reading and evaluating texts, in the use of a clear and effective writing style and in cogent argument. The practical advice, examples and exercises are invaluable for all students who would like to become better readers, writers and reasoners.

Excerpt

Consider for a moment what goes into a conversational exchange between two or more people. Naturally, there are the words spoken, but the how, when and where of their being spoken is just as important in the sending of a message as the mere words. When we speak our tone of voice and facial expression convey attitude and emotion. Conversations take place in a particular situation and a certain amount of background knowledge common to speaker and listener is generally taken for granted. For example, a woman sitting in a café where an amusing Incident happened before, might say to her friend, 'You remember the time when wo …' and leave the rest of the sentence unsaid, but employ a grimace or a wry smile to evoke the incident in question for her listener, It might have been a time when they were having a coffee and realized that neither of them had the money to pay the bill. A slight nod and smile from the listener is enough to show the woman that she has been understood. The physical situation of the café and the memory of shared experience are sufficient to convey her incomplete suggestion. Facial expression and gesture on the part of the listener reassure the speaker that her message has been understood.

What is left unsaid is often as important as what is said. for . . .

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