Peter Carey

Peter Carey

Peter Carey

Peter Carey

Synopsis

Peter Carey is one of the most respected novelists writing today. Since the original edition of this book, Carey's fiction has reached a far wider international audience: he has won the Booker Prize for the second time with True History of the Kelly Gang, while Oscar and Lucinda has been made into a successful feature film. Bruce Woodcock's revised and expanded critical study now includes detailed readings of the recent novels, Jack Maggs and True History of the Kelly Gang, seeing them as the finest productions of a writer who continues to surprise and delight his readers with inventive creations and unique imagination.

Excerpt

Contemporary World Writers is an innovative new series of authoritative introductions to a range of culturally diverse contemporary writers from outside Britain and the United States or from 'minority' backgrounds within Britain or the United States. In addition to providing comprehensive general introductions, books in the series also argue stimulating original theses, often but not always related to contemporary debates in post-colonial studies.

The series locates individual writers within their specific cultural contexts, while recognising that such contexts are themselves invariably a complex mixture of hybridised influences. It aims to counter tendencies to appropriate the writers discussed into the canon of English or American literature or to regard them as 'other'.

Each volume includes a chronology of the writer's life, an introductory section on formative contexts and intertexts, discussion of all the writer's major works, a bibliography of primary and secondary works and an index. Issues of racial, national and cultural identity are explored, as are gender and sexuality. Books in the series also examine writers' use of genre, particularly ways in which Western genres are adapted or subverted and 'traditional' local forms are reworked in a contemporary context.

Contemporary World Writers aims to bring together the theoretical impulse which currently dominates post-colonial studies and closely argued readings of particular authors' works, and by so doing to avoid the danger of appropriating the specifics of particular texts into the hegemony of totalising theories.

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