Heroes of Empire: The British Imperial Protagonist in America, 1596-1764

Heroes of Empire: The British Imperial Protagonist in America, 1596-1764

Heroes of Empire: The British Imperial Protagonist in America, 1596-1764

Heroes of Empire: The British Imperial Protagonist in America, 1596-1764

Synopsis

"The British representation of America in the colonial period is an unwieldy topic, and scholars have fashioned various points of focus for studies of imperialist discourse of the Americas, including cannibalism, translation, wonder, the figure of woman, the tropicopolitan, and the romance of the first encounter. This book adds to the studies of imperialist discourse by delineating in unprecedented detail the evolution of the British imperial hero from Sir Walter Ralegh's Discoverie of the Large, Rich, and Bewtiful Empyre of Guiana (1596) to James Grainger's The Sugar Cane (1764), with concentration on narratives produced between Cromwell's Western Design (1655) and the British raid on Cartegena (1741)." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

The conquest of the earth, which mostly means the taking it
away from those who have a different complexion or slightly
flatter noses than ourselves, is not a pretty thing when you
look into it too much. What redeems it is the idea only. An
idea at the back of it, not a sentimental pretense but an idea;
and an unselfish belief in the idea—something you can set
up, and bow down before, and offer a sacrifice to….

—Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness

Indeed, any concrete discourse (utterance) finds the object
at which it was directed already as it were overlain with
qualifications, open to dispute, charged with value, already
enveloped in an obscuring mist—or, on the contrary, by the
“light” of alien words that have already been spoken about it.
It is entangled, shot through with shared thoughts, points of
view, alien value judgments and accents. the word, directed
toward its object, enters a dialogically agitated and tension
filled environment of alien words, value judgments and
accents, weaves in and out of complex interrelationships,
merges with some, recoils from others, intersects with yet a
third group: and all this may crucially shape discourse, may
leave a trace in all its semantic layers, may complicate its
expression and influence its entire stylistic profile.

—Mikhail Bakhtin, Discourse in the Novel

The early enlightenment was a crucial era of british EXPANsion in America and consequently an important time in the evolution of its imperialist discourse and apology. An imprecise and incomplete outline on the map with uncertain interiors, the New . . .

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