Artists of Power: Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Their Enduring Impact on U.S. Foreign Policy

Artists of Power: Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Their Enduring Impact on U.S. Foreign Policy

Artists of Power: Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Their Enduring Impact on U.S. Foreign Policy

Artists of Power: Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Their Enduring Impact on U.S. Foreign Policy

Synopsis

Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson were remarkable statesmen, early 20th century "artists of power" whose diplomacy has had an enduring impact on U. S. foreign policy. These two leaders were creative, farsighted diplomatists who confronted serious international challenges during their presidencies, and who conceived and implemented policies designed both to resolve immediate problems and to set the United States on the best possible course for the future. Crafted by prominent historians, the eight chapters of this volume implicitly and explicitly urge students of history to recognize that both Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson were intelligent, insightful, forward-looking statesmen, and that since World War II the influence of their ideas and approaches on U. S. diplomacy has been ongoing and significant.

Excerpt

Erik Goldstein, William R. Keylor, and Cathal J. Nolan

This series furthers historical writing that is genuinely international in scope and multi-archival in methodology. It publishes different types of works in the field of international history: scholarly monographs which elucidate important but hitherto unexplored or under-explored topics; more general works which incorporate the results of specialized studies and present them to a wider public; and edited volumes which bring together distinguished scholars to address salient issues in international history.

The series promotes scholarship in traditional sub-fields of international history such as the political, military, diplomatic, and economic relations among states. But it also welcomes studies which address topics of non-state history and of more recent interest, such as the role of international non-governmental organizations in promoting new policies, cultural relations among societies, and the history of private international economic activity.

In short, while this series happily embraces traditional diplomatic history, it does not operate on the assumption that the state is an autonomous actor in international relations and that the job of the international historian is done solely by consulting the official records left behind by various foreign offices. Instead, it encourages scholarly work which also probes the broader forces within society that influence the formulation and execution of foreign policies, social tensions, religious and ethnic conflict, economic competition, environmental concerns, scientific and technology issues, and international cultural relations.

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