Becoming Film Literate: The Art and Craft of Motion Pictures

Becoming Film Literate: The Art and Craft of Motion Pictures

Becoming Film Literate: The Art and Craft of Motion Pictures

Becoming Film Literate: The Art and Craft of Motion Pictures

Synopsis

Though movies have remained our foremost cultural pastime for over 100 years, many of us still know very little about the tools used to create them. In this groundbreaking new book, Vincent LoBrutto provides an enjoyable and accessible education in the art of cinema: using 50 landmark films spanning the history of the medium, LoBrutto illustrates such important concepts as editing, production design, cinematography, sound, screen acting, narrative structure, and various genres, nationalities, and film eras. Each concept is illustrated by the selection of a film that epitomizes its use, so that readers will learn about film authorship in Citizen Kane, multiplot narrative in Nashville, widescreen filmmaking in Rebel without a Cause, and screen violence in The Wild Bunch. Explaining the various tricks of the moviemaking trade, Becoming Film Literate offers a crash course in cinema, one designed to give even the novice reader a solid introduction to this complex and multifaceted medium.

Though movies have remained our foremost cultural pastime for over 100 years, many of us still know very little about the tools used to create them. In this groundbreaking new book, Vincent LoBrutto provides an enjoyable and accessible education in the art of cinema: using 50 landmark films spanning the history of the medium, LoBrutto illustrates such important concepts as editing, production design, cinematography, sound, screen acting, narrative structure, and various genres, nationalities, and film eras. Each concept is illustrated by the selection of a film that epitomizes its use, so that readers will learn about film authorship in Citizen Kane, multiplot narrative in Nashville, widescreen filmmaking in Rebel without a Cause, and screen violence in The Wild Bunch.

Providing a unique opportunity to become acquainted with important movies and the elements of their greatness, Becoming Film Literate offers a crash course in cinema, one designed to give even the novice reader a solid introduction to this complex and multifaceted medium.

Excerpt

LoBrutto's book reminds me of a big party; somehow the topic of films comes up and leads to the question: [What is your favorite film?] This is like poking into an ants' nest. Suddenly the room is abuzz with titles and arguments: The Sound of Music, Gone with the Wind, Casablanca, Citizen Kane, Dr. Strangelove, Some Like It Hot, Rashomon, Psycho, Star Wars, The Blue Angel, E.T., The Seventh Seal, Annie Hall, Les Enfants du Paradis, Fahrenheit 9/11, Manhattan, Fanny and Alexander, My Fair Lady…. One skinny intellectual whispers wistfully, while extracting the last puff from his cigarette, [If I can have only one I'll have to have these three: Hiroshima Mon Amour, Orphee, and Last Year at Marienbad.] What a bunch. That's who we are. All this represents us.

Look back into history: Once the great inventions and wars and all the terrible deeds of mankind have been put away into history books, what's left? What is the first entry into the past? The arts: the pyramids in Egypt, the great cathedrals, the monuments of Babylon (Iraq today), paintings, sculptures, plays and operas, symphonies, and all sorts of compositions and books. It is the arts that give us the first insight. The writers and painters, the architects and composers allow us a glimpse into prior centuries more than anything else. Since the early 1900s, filmmakers have been added to this noble group, and I have no doubt that future generations will look at the twentieth century and our different cultures on this shrinking globe through the eyes of artists like Orson Welles, Ingmar Bergman, Woody Allen, Stanley Kubrick, Carlos Saura, Edgar Reitz . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.