Economic Sanctions: Examining Their Philosophy and Efficacy

Economic Sanctions: Examining Their Philosophy and Efficacy

Economic Sanctions: Examining Their Philosophy and Efficacy

Economic Sanctions: Examining Their Philosophy and Efficacy

Synopsis

In this, the first of three related, empirically based studies, Askari, Forrer, Teegen, and Yang examine the broad philosophy behind economic sanctions: why they are used and what they are meant to achieve. In addition they examine whether or not sanctions can be successful and offer an analysis of the implications of sanctions.

Excerpt

Throughout history, countries and organizations have used economic sanctions to coerce and to change the policies of an adversary. Sometimes sanctions have been the sole policy instrument, and at other times sanctions have been accompanied by diplomatic or military actions.

Economic sanctions are generally seen as a foreign policy option that resides somewhere between diplomacy and military engagement. An important factor in favor of economic sanctions from the point of view of those who impose a sanction is that they expand the options of countries to protest or influence the policies of other countries without taking military actions that could escalate into a more dangerous and costly conflict. Economic sanctions pressure an adversary to modify its policies by imposing an economic cost on it for continuing the policies or actions found to be objectionable.

Economic sanctions may take different forms and therefore induce different levels of economic costs. At one extreme, an economic sanction may be limited, targeting a narrow aspect of another country's economy. For example, the United States restricts the eligibility of some countries to participate in U.S. export assistance programs. Prohibiting participation in U.S. export assistance programs raises the cost of imports from the United States to ineligible countries relative to the cost of imports from the United States for countries that are eligible. Limited in their scope, and therefore causing a limited effect on a sanctioned country's economy, they may do little more than signal protest against a country's policy or action.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.