The Evolution of School Disturbance in America: Colonial Times to Modern Day

The Evolution of School Disturbance in America: Colonial Times to Modern Day

The Evolution of School Disturbance in America: Colonial Times to Modern Day

The Evolution of School Disturbance in America: Colonial Times to Modern Day

Synopsis

This work is a cross-sectional analysis of the evolution of school disturbance in the United States. Social and educational developments and the characteristics of school disturbances are examined in five periods: the Colonial Period, the Early National Period, the Common School Period, the Progressive Period, and the Kaleidoscopic period.

Excerpt

Two beliefs about education can be stated with almost absolute certainty. First, U.S. schools mirror U.S. society. As behaviors and attitudes change in society, so will they in education. Second, education in the United States has always followed a course directed by the prominent social developments of the time. Any significant change in U.S. schooling can be directly attributed to a change in social philosophy of that time. A third statement, perhaps more debatable than the preceeding two, is that education has always been asked to solve problems that it did not create in social environments that it cannot control. Evidence to support these three ideas can be found in any period of U.S. history.

PURPOSE OF WORK

In determining educational practices for their schools, policy makers, educators, and parents must often find their way through myriad conventions, recommendations, and theories. Much of this information is, in reality, misinformation, based on prejudice, lack of knowledge, fear, panic, opinions, and individual biased perspectives.

If the United States is ever to improve education and training to meet the ambitious national education goals, research must inform and encourage the development of sound policies and practices by making available, in a clear and understandable format, the most comprehensive information . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.