Global Order and Global Disorder: Globalization and the Nation-State

Global Order and Global Disorder: Globalization and the Nation-State

Global Order and Global Disorder: Globalization and the Nation-State

Global Order and Global Disorder: Globalization and the Nation-State

Excerpt

This book is about the end of the current world order and the rise of globalization. We are witnessing the end of what international lawyers call the Westphalian System of nation-states. The erosion of that system is manifested in, for example, the increasing influence of transnational corporations in national economies, the growing recognition by intergovernmental organizations of the need to respect human rights, and the capacity of nongovernmental organizations to draw attention to the need to protect the environment. National governments will remain in existence but they will have reduced significance. We are moving from a world with borders to one without.

This book, then, is an examination of the changing global structure. It is not an attempt to predict the shape of the new global order that is coming into being with the erosion of the nation-state. No one knows for sure where the process of globalization will take the world.

This is a very exciting time to live. The Westphalian System began three centuries ago. We are living on the hinge of history: one era is swinging closed and another is swinging open.

This book draws upon my activities in three areas. I have been involved in the work of the United Nations Association (in the UK and Australia) for over thirty years. I wrote my first book on the UN for the UN Association of Australia in 1985: Reshaping the Global Agenda.

Second, I belong to a variety of other nongovernmental organizations, such as The Club of Rome and the World Federalists. These, too, have been useful sources of information. The Australian Branch of the World Federalists encouraged me to write my first book on globalization in 1981 titled A New International Order: Proposals for Making a Better World.

Finally, I have designed and taught courses on globalization at the University of Sydney, the University of New South Wales and the Workers Education Association in Sydney. The best way to learn is to teach, and I am grateful for my contacts with students over all the years. I am pleased to note the growth of interest in the subject of globalization over time.

I am also very grateful to the team at Greenwood.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.