Historical Dictionary of the U.S. Army

Historical Dictionary of the U.S. Army

Historical Dictionary of the U.S. Army

Historical Dictionary of the U.S. Army

Synopsis

Provides clear, authoritative entries on military terms, concepts, arms and equipment, units and organizations, battles, and people who have had a significant impact on the Army.

Excerpt

The U.S. Army has evolved, changed, and matured over the past two and a quarter centuries to become the premier military force in the world. During that time, the American soldier has served loyally and faithfully in war and peace, contributing to the development of the nation and fighting for freedom and American ideals on battlefields around the world. The Army's heritage is rich in history, tradition, and lore.

Compiling and editing this one-volume historical dictionary of the U.S. Army has been a challenge and an opportunity. The opportunity has been to bring to the interested reader, student, and researcher a broad cross section of military terms, concepts, arms and equipment, units and organizations, campaigns and battles, and individuals who have contributed significantly to the U.S. Army. The challenge has been to select those entries that will be of greatest value to users of this volume.

I began the selection of entries with a list of terms and names that I had accumulated from student questions and concerns during my more than twenty years of teaching both graduate and undergraduate courses in American and military history. I further selected entries suggested or recommended by my colleagues at the Combat Studies Institute, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College; by scholars and historians I invited to contribute to the volume; and by officers, teachers, and archivists with extensive knowledge of U.S. Army history and historiography. Unfortunately, space made it impossible to include all of the proposals I received; I had to omit a number of excellent submissions. I am fully responsible for the final selection of entries.

The terms, names, and concepts common to the U.S. Army are to be found in a wide variety of sources. These sources include books—both nonfiction and fiction; biographies; autobiographies; memoirs; monographs; general and military histories; articles and essays in professional and popular periodicals; journals; magazines; official, semiofficial, and private unit, organizational, and . . .

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