Integrating Newly Merged Organizations

Integrating Newly Merged Organizations

Integrating Newly Merged Organizations

Integrating Newly Merged Organizations

Excerpt

Throughout my career, I have concentrated on delivering value to the stockholders by applying my training in areas such as accounting, planning and strategy, treasury, and international operations. I've worked all over the world in many industries, ranging from short-cycle consumer and hightechnology businesses, to the slower paced capital goods industry, to service industries. Early in my career, my contribution was limited to doing as an individual contributor. As I matured in both personal and business experience, I eventually led the finance, administration, and information technology functions, and I became the CFO of companies, ranging from one of the [Hottest Growth Companies in America] to a billion-dollar global company. This mosaic of experience and training was the basis of my drive to increase value through M&A business integration by planning and executing—and not just strategizing.

Early in my career, it seemed that many M&A activities and strategies that companies embarked upon just didn't happen in the real world. Although the theoretical numbers proved beyond any doubt that it—the company acquisition, the newly acquired product, the new distributor venture, and so forth—would add value, it often didn't happen as expected. The Wall Street Journal, Business Week, Fortune, Forbes, and other publications often boldly reported these failures. In fact, perhaps more than 60 percent of the time, acquisitions don't add value.

While at Bausch & Lomb in the 1980s, I learned that developing a wellthought-out plan focusing on the critical success factors that support the . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.