The Counter-Reformation in Central Europe: Styria 1580-1630

The Counter-Reformation in Central Europe: Styria 1580-1630

The Counter-Reformation in Central Europe: Styria 1580-1630

The Counter-Reformation in Central Europe: Styria 1580-1630

Synopsis

'A significant contribution to the growing body of literature on central Europe's Catholic resurgence in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries... The Counter-Reformation in Central Europe is a superb political microstudy. Pörtner has pulled together the various strands of a complicated narrative and tells a compelling story... Pörtner's monograph is one of the most insightful analyses of Counter-Reformation politics that has appeared in the past decade.' -English Historical ReviewThis is a detailed and scholarly account of religious belief and conflict in the strategically important province of Inner Austria between 1580 and 1630. Dr Pörtner analyses the aims, achievements, and shortcomings of the Habsburgs' confessional crusade in Styria, showing how although the progress of Protestantization was reversed, the Counter-Reformation left an ambivalent legacy to the modern Austrian state.

Excerpt

This book is based on a doctoral thesis that was submitted to the Faculty of Modern History at the University of Oxford in December 1997, and accepted in spring 1998. in writing the thesis and preparing the revised text for publication, I have benefited from the help and support of a number of people and institutions in England, Austria, Italy, and Germany, who have turned this project into a truly European undertaking.

First and foremost, I would like to thank my supervisors, Prof. R. J. W. Evans and Prof. P. G. M. Dickson, whose advice and criticism have been of immeasurable value. the magisterial studies of both scholars have been an important source of inspiration, and have helped me develop a better grasp of the general issues involved in the present case study. the revised text has further benefited from constructive criticism by the examiners of the doctoral thesis, Prof. Winfried Schulze (Munich) and Dr Clifford Davies (Oxford), while Prof. Sir John Elliott and Robin Briggs (Oxford) gave important advice during the preliminary stages of my work. While carrying out archival research in Austria, I was most fortunate in receiving expert guidance from the outstanding legal and economic historian of Inner Austria, Prof. Helfried Valentinitsch (Graz), who has encouraged and most generously supported my work in various ways. I was equally lucky in profiting from Prof. Grete Klingenstein's (Graz) wide-ranging knowledge and profound insights into the history of eighteenth-century Austria and Enlightenment Europe. Conversations with Prof. Karl Amon and Prof. Maximilian Liebmann of the Faculty of Theology (Graz) have likewise been instructive in illuminating the ecclesiastical and theological context of my topic. My work in the Austrian archives and libraries in Vienna and Graz in general, and in the Styrian state and ecclesiastical archives in particular, was made both pleasurable and productive by the professional expertise and unfailingly kind response of the staff. in particular, I would like to thank Dr Karl Spreitzhofer, Dr Gernot Obersteiner, Dr Peter Wiesflecker and Ms. Cornelia Ohlsacher of the Steiermärkisches Landesarchiv Graz, and Dr Alois Ruhri of the Diözesanarchiv Graz-Seckau. I further owe special thanks to the directors of both institutions, Hofrat Dr Gerhard Pferschy and Dr Norbert Müller, for supporting my applications for grants. My requests at the General Archive of the Society of Jesus in Rome were . . .

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