Progress against Heart Disease

Progress against Heart Disease

Progress against Heart Disease

Progress against Heart Disease

Synopsis

"In the last 35 years, declining deaths from heart disease have translated into 13 million saved or extended lives. Medical treatments and lifestyle changes have dealt successfully with the heart problems of Vice President Richard Cheney, talk show host David Letterman, Disney-ABC CEO Michael Eisner, and millions of ordinary men and women. In the past, those with serious heart disease would have died young; today, they can live long and active lives. Pampel and Pauley review the progress in this crucially important area of health, offering an optimistic view of the potential for continued improvement and longer, healthier lives. They show that despite the prevalence of heart disease, deaths from this cause have greatly declined in recent decades. From its peak in 1968, the heart disease mortality rate has fallen by 52 percent for men and 48 percent for women. This book also shows that the benefits are not limited to the very old. In fact, heart disease mortality has fallen more rapidly among the young and middle aged." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

In 1978, the same year he won election to the first of his five terms as a Wyoming congressman, Dick Cheney had his first heart attack. He suffered another attack in 1984 and then a third in 1988 at age 47, but heart bypass surgery stabilized his condition until November 2000. While running for vice president, he experienced chest pains, and doctors inserted a coronary stent to prop open a narrow artery. In March 2001, now Vice President Cheney entered a Washington, D.C., hospital with chest pains and underwent a procedure to reopen the blocked artery. Just a few months later, he had a device implanted to monitor and, if necessary, slow his heart rhythm. After the surgery, the doctors said his prognosis was [terrific.] Now over age 60 and with a 23-year history of heart problems, Vice President Cheney remains fully active in his duties. He sticks faithfully to his diet and exercises almost daily on his stationary bike.

In January 2000, Late Show host David Letterman announced to guest Regis Philbin and the audience that he planned to undergo some heart tests. He said he had very high cholesterol ([Its borderline … 680,] he joked) and a lifestyle not well suited to a healthy heart. Moreover, his father had a heart attack at age 36 and died of a coronary attack at age 57 in 1973. After the test showed blockages in his arteries, Letterman underwent emergency quintuple bypass surgery. The procedure was a complete success, allowing the host to return to the show a few weeks later. Whatever problems led to the blockages, Letterman is doing well. He now jogs regularly, has lost weight, follows a low-fat diet, and continues to host his late-night show.

In 1957 at age 40, Nathan Pritikin discovered he had a seriously high . . .

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