Creative Expressive Activities and Asperger's Syndrome: Social and Emotional Skills and Positive Life Goals for Adolescents and Young Adults

Creative Expressive Activities and Asperger's Syndrome: Social and Emotional Skills and Positive Life Goals for Adolescents and Young Adults

Creative Expressive Activities and Asperger's Syndrome: Social and Emotional Skills and Positive Life Goals for Adolescents and Young Adults

Creative Expressive Activities and Asperger's Syndrome: Social and Emotional Skills and Positive Life Goals for Adolescents and Young Adults

Synopsis

"Creative Expressive Activities and Asperger's Syndrome helps build strengths and resilience in people with Asperger's Syndrome by developing their unique abilities and potential. Individualized therapy in a group context is achieved through combining a variety of creative activities including art, drama, music, puppetry, relaxation techniques, and photography with conventional cognitive behavioral interventions. The practical and versatile activities, designed to address specific traits and strengths, complement and reinforce each other and can be adapted for different age and skill levels, objectives, and settings. Creative Expressive Activities and Asperger's Syndrome is a comprehensive resource for parents as well as teachers, social workers, psychologists, and arts therapists who wish to link therapeutic goals with creative activities for people with or without AS."

Excerpt

What this life will amount to is in part determined by the chemical
processes in our body, by the biological interaction among organs, by
the tiny electrical currents jumping between the synapses of the brain,
and by the organization of information that the culture imposes on our
mind. But the actual quality of life – what we do, and how we feel about
it – will be determined by our thoughts and emotions; by the interpreta
tions we give to chemical, biological and social processes. (Mihaly
Csikszentmihalyi)

Introduction to Asperger's Syndrome

Asperger's Syndrome was identified as a pattern of traits about 50 years ago by Hans Asperger. Knowledge about it has expanded considerably since then, particularly in the last ten years. The complexity of the syndrome is still emerging and there are mixed theories but no conclusion about its cause. Sometimes Asperger's Syndrome is easily identified. Obsessive behavior, literal speech, or intolerance of some sensory stimulation typically signpost the AS pattern. Sometimes, however, behaviors are not strong enough to be diagnosed as part of the Asperger pattern and are seen as simply quirky or eccentric personality traits.

For those with very strong traits of Asperger's, there may be difficulties in adulthood with independent living, employment, and relationships. Yet for others, traits such as differences in thought processing may be more subtle and individuals seen simply as unconventional, eccentric, or difficult. As they get older, many people will learn through experience and observation, developing skills and modifying their behavior accordingly.

Individuals with mild Asperger traits are very capable of living fulfilled and independent lives, never identified as having Asperger's Syndrome. Uni-

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