Deportation Is Freedom! The Orwellian World of Immigration Controls

Deportation Is Freedom! The Orwellian World of Immigration Controls

Deportation Is Freedom! The Orwellian World of Immigration Controls

Deportation Is Freedom! The Orwellian World of Immigration Controls

Synopsis

"Deportation is Freedom! is a searing critique which exposes striking analogies between immigration systems and controls and George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four, the classic oppressive vision of totalitarianism, nationalism and terror. Steve Cohen takes a fresh look at the ethical and political problems surrounding immigration controls. He highlights the corruption of language for political purposes, revealing a culture immersed in 'Big Brother', 'newspeak', 'Doublethink,' 'memory holes' and 'thought police', and scrutinizes recent developments in UK and worldwide immigration policy. Cohen's penetrating analysis finds the system of immigration controls to be inherently racist, unjust and irrational: an intractable nightmare for immigrants, migrants and refugees." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

This is absurd, they really do everything they can to devalue you.

– Algerian refugee seeking asylum in Canada

I agree with your opposition to immigration controls, but it is not
practical. It is a good idea, but there are too many people here
already. in principle you are right, but there are not enough jobs.
It sounds ok, but the welfare system could not cope. It would be
fine, but there are not enough houses. I support your idealism,
but the country is already overpopulated. What you say might
make sense, but how will we preserve British culture? I am on
your side, but all other countries have controls. in theory I see eye
to eye with you, but how will you stop terrorists getting in? I'm
not a racist, but…

The first quotation provides a one-sentence summary of the political and psychological consequences of immigration controls as experienced by someone on the receiving end. the second passage is a concocted monologue by an onlooker of controls. I have repeatedly heard similar monologues expressed in response to the case for the abolition or destruction of immigration controls – that is, the case for a world with no borders. the mantra of the 'but' has achieved near-Zen status.

Positing the complete abolition of controls seems to be one of the last few remaining areas of human discourse that is, intellectually, forbidden territory. It has been caricatured as being so extreme as to rank alongside support for child abuse as a politically unsustainable position. Ironically, the assertion that controls have to be maintained as other countries possess them would appear to place abolition of immigration restrictions alongside unilateral nuclear disarmament as a political . . .

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