Music Therapy and Neurological Rehabilitation: Performing Health

Music Therapy and Neurological Rehabilitation: Performing Health

Music Therapy and Neurological Rehabilitation: Performing Health

Music Therapy and Neurological Rehabilitation: Performing Health

Synopsis

"The central tenet of this innovative collection is that identity can be regarded as a performance, achieved through and in dialogue with others. The authors show that where neuro-degenerative disease restricts movement, communication and thought processes and impairs the sense of self, music therapy is an effective intervention in neurological rehabilitation, successfully restoring the performance of identity within which clients can recognise themselves. It can also aid rehabilitation of clients affected by dementia, traumatic brain injury, and multiple sclerosis, among other neuro-generative diseases. Music Therapy and Neurological Rehabilitation is an authoritative and comprehensive text that will be of interest to practising music therapists, students and academics in the field." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

There are often hidden motives for research and as research supervisors we will always ask why the researcher has chosen his or her topic. The motives will be various. Some wish to serve the community. Some will serve the profession. And sometimes we serve ourselves, not simply with the achievement of a qualification or a title, but in reaching a level of knowledge that reconciles a personal need. The same applies to editing books. We scrutinize particular problems because they raise questions and doubts within ourselves. Much of my early work with suicide and palliative care was a struggle with the angel of death, as was continuing work with spirituality and the meaning of dying. This volume is no different. It returns me to that nightmare of not being able to communicate, reconciled by the hope of song.

In my early contact with music therapy I saw how amusic therapist communicated with a woman who, so we were told, could not communicate. But she did – or rather, they did. Therapist and patient sang together. The seemingly random screeches of a young handicapped woman were woven up into a tapestry of sounds. This was music and it was a clear denunciation of her non-communicativeness. And that touched a chord in me. Despite a career involving public speaking, a deluge of writing and a shower of singing, I still experience the horror of the thought that I will wake up not being able to communicate. Dumb. Voiceless. Inarticulate. Not being understood. But if we allow others to reach out to us, then we can be articulate. Communication is not resident in one person. Mutuality is central to our lives.

The authors in this book grapple with the same problem. Through them I have been able to see new perspectives on how we communicate with those who are deemed uncommunicative, or who are confronted with future failure. Through . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.