How to Help a Clumsy Child: Strategies for Young Children with Developmental Motor Concerns

How to Help a Clumsy Child: Strategies for Young Children with Developmental Motor Concerns

How to Help a Clumsy Child: Strategies for Young Children with Developmental Motor Concerns

How to Help a Clumsy Child: Strategies for Young Children with Developmental Motor Concerns

Synopsis

"How to Help a Clumsy Child is a practical resource manual and 'how to help' book for parents and professionals, offering sensible advice on how to recognize normal and abnormal motor development, how to seek help and specific teaching strategies to aid a clumsy child in the classroom, playground and home. Discussing diverse approaches to coordination problems, including reviews of controversial therapies, Lisa Kurtz uses clear diagrams and tables along with extensive contact information to make this an essential and accessible resource." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

It's not hard to recognize a clumsy child. This is the child who, despite a normal appearance in every other way, constantly attracts the attention of playmates and adults by dropping everything that is handled, tripping over the smallest of obstacles, and falling frequent victim to a variety of minor 'accidents' related to physical awkwardness. He or she may have trouble learning to draw or write, cannot easily button clothes or tie shoes, becomes frustrated when learning new skills, and may unfortunately be teased or victimized by other children for being 'different' or 'klutzy'. It is common for children with clumsiness to have low self-esteem, for they are expected to compete in a society that places high value on athletics and other physical accomplishments, especially during the early childhood years.

The ability to coordinate body movements varies considerably among individuals, not only in childhood but throughout the adult years. Like other aspects of human performance, the quality of a person's motor coordination depends upon the combined influences of several factors, including the rate of developmental maturation, the person's inherited ability or talent, and his or her motivation to practice and refine these skills. Not surprisingly, children who have . . .

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