Children with Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties and Communication Problems: There Is Always a Reason

Children with Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties and Communication Problems: There Is Always a Reason

Children with Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties and Communication Problems: There Is Always a Reason

Children with Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties and Communication Problems: There Is Always a Reason

Synopsis

"With a range of strategies to help children and young people to develop their emotional and communicative skills, this accessible guide is a resource for speech and language therapists, social workers, teachers and other health professionals working with young people with emotional, behavioural and communication problems." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

This is the book I needed when I began to work with children and young people with emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD). As a speech and language therapist I knew about communication but I found it difficult to understand how communication problems related to EBD; was there a link between the two and if so, why? Initially I had difficulty persuading other professionals that communication problems were significant for these young people; after all, many of them had had severely disrupted lives and little formal education, so did a few additional speech and language problems really matter? The short answer and the main thrust of this book is that, yes, they do matter. They matter because emotional and language development are linked and intertwined. Communication problems can impair someone's ability to interact, manage their behaviour, learn and think.

My initial impressions of working with children with EBD were mixed. I was horrified one morning by the sight of a nine-year-old having a violent 'temper tantrum' like a two-year-old. He was expressing rage beyond anything I had ever experienced and he appeared to be totally out of control. Of course, it wasn't really what had happened in the playground which had caused this reaction but something grim in his past, but that wasn't immediately obvious. I was impressed by the adults with him who managed to gently 'sandwich' him between them on a bench until he was able to calm down. They could see beyond the appalling behaviour to the terrified child. They didn't want to punish him but to help him understand that he was safe and that they didn't want him to get hurt. As I got to know this boy I found out that he had specific communication problems which meant that, although he was bright, he was not able to say what he wanted to very easily and he did not always understand what others said to him.

These communication problems had not been identified before, even though they were often the cause of great frustration for him. This communication frustration was an additional load on a young man who was already struggling with coming to terms with his past, who was unable to make friends and who was not progressing in school. Indeed, I shall argue that his communication problems and those of so many like him directly affected his ability to learn, reason and interact with others. Language and communication . . .

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