Boys Who Have Abused: Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy with Victim/Perpetrators of Sexual Abuse

Boys Who Have Abused: Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy with Victim/Perpetrators of Sexual Abuse

Boys Who Have Abused: Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy with Victim/Perpetrators of Sexual Abuse

Boys Who Have Abused: Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy with Victim/Perpetrators of Sexual Abuse

Synopsis

John Woods presents a theoretical approach and practical suggestions for mental health practitioners working therapeutically with young people who have abused. Drawing on his long-standing experience, he has developed an integrated theory that bridges the gap between existing cognitive behavioural and psychoanalytic approaches. He shows how this treatment model can be applied in a range of contexts including residential settings, group and family work, as well as in individual work. In-depth case studies throughout the book demonstrate how exploring the individual's whole life-course within a psychoanalytic framework enables connections to be drawn between possible childhood abuse and subsequent abusive behaviour. Guidelines are presented on working with the problems of self-destructiveness, masochism and depression facing the young abused/abuser and the impact of sexual abuse on sexuality, gender identity and sexual orientation. This is an instructive and thought-provoking text for all mental health practitioners and allied professionals working with adolescents who sexually offend.

Excerpt

John Woods is the ideal psychotherapist to write about a psychoanalytic approach to therapeutic work with young people perpetrating sexually abusive behaviour. As an experienced child psychotherapist, he has worked for many years with the generality of young people with emotional problems to help contextualise his specialist interest in young people who abuse sexually. He has a training in group analysis, and is interested in the way that groups function, whether in residential contexts, or in applying the principles to develop group work with a group analytic orientation. He has worked in a variety of out-patient and residential contexts, and with young people of all levels of ability, and of complexity of presenting problems. Importantly, he has also worked with colleagues with a wide range of orientations, whose major aim has been to create a therapeutic climate for young people, to help them develop an abuse-free life so they can achieve their potential, and to protect the community. He has kept the banner of psychoanalytic thinking aloft, yet he has absorbed and understood the approaches associated with his colleagues' thinking. He respects the impact of different approaches, and has attempted to understand both when they are indicated, and what are the shortcomings and value of both their approaches and his own.

He has brought a broad range of current thinking together and has considered how his psychoanalytic approach needs to be modified to meet the needs of young people, and to balance the intimacy and confidentiality of the psychotherapeutic encounter, with the need for maintaining a systemic, open approach to communication. This ensures that a young person is managed safely and benefits from a broad range of interventions.

John Woods processes the research and clinical experience which now confirms the malign effect on young people growing up in a climate of violence. Through detailed work with young people, he has described the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.