A Comprehensive Guide to Music Therapy: Theory, Clinical Practice, Research, and Training

A Comprehensive Guide to Music Therapy: Theory, Clinical Practice, Research, and Training

A Comprehensive Guide to Music Therapy: Theory, Clinical Practice, Research, and Training

A Comprehensive Guide to Music Therapy: Theory, Clinical Practice, Research, and Training

Synopsis

Music therapists have a diversity of approaches and methods, often developed with specific relevance to meet the needs of a certain client population. This work reflects the components of such diversity.

Excerpt

Music has been a medium of therapy for centuries, and there are numerous examples of the curative or healing powers of music in the historical records of different cultures (Campbell 1991; Gouk 2000; Horden 2000; Pratt and Jones 1988; Wigram et al. 1995 – see the overview in Chapter 1.1).

Over the last fifty years, music therapy has developed as a clinically applied treatment administered by trained professionals in countries where the development of graduate and post-graduate level training and clinical practice has resulted in qualified and recognized practitioners. Music therapy is now accepted as a discipline alongside other paramedical professions such as physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy and psychology in paramedical services and special educational services provided by health and education authorities.

In some countries, music therapy is officially recognized by political, clinical and academic institutions or organizations, and also by employment agencies. In other countries music therapy still has not found recognition as a science and as a profession. Styles of work vary considerably, and are influenced by the clinical field within which the music therapists are working, and the training and cultural background from which they come. Recent publications have highlighted the wide application and enormous diversity of music therapy (Aigen 1998; D. Aldridge 1996a; D. Aldridge 1998a; D. Aldridge 2000; Aldridge et al. 2001; Benenzon 1997; Bruscia 1987, 1991, 1998a, 1998b; Bunt 1994; Decker-Voigt and Knill 1996; Dileo 1999; Heal and Wigram 1993; Kenny 1995; Pratt and Grocke 1999; Tomaino 1998; Wigram and DeBacker 1999a,1999b;Wigram, Saperston and West 1995).

In Europe, music therapy traditions have developed on the foundations of more psychodynamic and psychotherapeutically orientated approaches. Frequently one finds here a model where the therapist is actively using music-making through the medium of clinical improvisation in order to establish a musical relationship with the patients through which he or she will be able to help them understand the nature of their problem. This active form of music therapy has involved the development of music therapy training programs which require, at entry level, highly trained . . .

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