The Relations of History and Geography: Studies in England, France and the United States

The Relations of History and Geography: Studies in England, France and the United States

The Relations of History and Geography: Studies in England, France and the United States

The Relations of History and Geography: Studies in England, France and the United States

Synopsis

The two leading thinkers in historical geography in the English-speaking world in the mid-twentieth century were Carl Sauer and H. C. Darby. Critical evaluations of the work of Carl Sauer have been published but so far none have examined the contribution of H. C. Darby, although the influence of his ideas on his students and many other contemporary scholars in geography, history and archaeology can be seen in the development of landscape studies and advances in the understanding of processes of geographical change. This set of twelve previously unpublished essays on historical geography written by Darby in the 1960s explains the basis of his ideas. The material was intended by Darby as a book, but he failed to complete this in his lifetime. The essays are divided into three quartets of studies relating to England, France and the United States. They are accompanied by contributions from Hugh Clout, T. J. Coppock, Hugh Prince and Michael Williams which both contextualise the material and bring it up-to-date.

Excerpt

After the death of Clifford Darby on 14 April 1992, Lady Darby asked Terry Coppock, as someone who had been closely associated with Darby over forty years, to look through his papers. These included two sets of unpublished typescripts, one comprising draft chapters on the Changing English Landscape, the other a set of twelve chapters on the methodology of historical geography.

The chapters on the Changing English Landscape, each covering a separate theme, had formed the basis of the first-year course he gave from 1954 onwards. But they were unreferenced, they were heavily dependent on maps and other illustrations which were unlisted and not available, some chapters were missing and several had already appeared either in separate papers or as chapters in books. Although many former students and colleagues would have appreciated seeing the various themes published in a single volume, preparing it would have been a major task verging on the impossible.

The methodological chapters, on the other hand, on the relations of geography and history, which had also never been published, were largely referenced and required few illustrations. They comprised three sets of four chapters entitled 'The Geography behind History'; 'Past Geographies'; 'The History behind Geography'; and 'The Historical Element in Geography', grouped by area—England, France and the United States. They seem to have been written in the 1950s and early 1960s and not to have been subsequently revised; they also lack any introduction covering their origin. Although historical geography has moved on since they were written, they provide amplification of the thinking of the leading figure in historical geography in England, and there was a consensus that they should be published. This was also the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.