The State and Educational Change: Essays in the History of Education and Pedagogy

The State and Educational Change: Essays in the History of Education and Pedagogy

The State and Educational Change: Essays in the History of Education and Pedagogy

The State and Educational Change: Essays in the History of Education and Pedagogy

Synopsis

This volume examines the role of the state in education. The opening essay, Why should we teach the history of education?, sets out to make a renewed case for the study of the history of education by all those involved in the educational process, especially policy-makers.

Excerpt

This volume comprises a number of essays, sometimes lectures, written and delivered over the last few years focussing largely on the history of education but also on problems of pedagogy which remains an area of interest and concern. Most of the chapters have been published in one form or another, though several in relatively obscure or professional journals not easy for the general reader to monitor. Three of the chapters (3, 9 and 11) have not been published elsewhere.

The book is divided into three Parts. The single chapter which forms Part One sets out to make a renewed case for the study of the history of education by teachers, students and indeed all those involved in the educational process as a whole. The book, of which it forms the opening chapter, 'Why Should We Teach the History of Education?', comprises contributions from historians of education in several countries. This was the brain child of an old friend, Kadriya Salimova of Moscow, herself an historian of education recently elected as a member of the Russian Academy of Educational Sciences. In spite of all the difficulties in Moscow over the last two or three years, Professor Salimova, who headed a Working Group of the International Standing Conference for the History of Education concerned with this initiative, succeeded in bring this book out. Printed and published (in English) in Moscow in 1993, this is a forerunner of further books being planned internationally under the same auspices. Theoretical studies in education are clearly unpopular among the political authorities in Britain at the moment, though whether historical studies can be so categorised is doubtful. In spite of the cold climate, or rather precisely because of it, I felt challenged, on receiving the invitation to contribute, to attempt to articulate once again some, at least, of the reasons why historical studies remain highly relevant to students, teachers and indeed (perhaps especially) to policy-makers in education.

Part Two contains the bulk of the strictly historical studies in this volume. In the mid-1980s I became involved in an international research project based on the University of Bochum in what was then . . .

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