Persuasive Business Proposals: Writing to Win More Customers, Clients, and Contracts

Persuasive Business Proposals: Writing to Win More Customers, Clients, and Contracts

Persuasive Business Proposals: Writing to Win More Customers, Clients, and Contracts

Persuasive Business Proposals: Writing to Win More Customers, Clients, and Contracts

Synopsis

"With over 40,000 copies sold, the first edition of Persuasive Business Proposals helped many readers construct dynamic, effective proposals. Now in paperback, this fully-revised second edition still gives readers simple, effective techniques for organizing, writing, and delivering proposals while updating the author's winning strategies for today's global business environment.

By cutting through the confusion, and providing dozens of real-world examples, this updated version provides step-by-step instructions for crafting value-centered, recipient-specific proposal packages, with all-new discussions on:

- How to increase business using new communication channels from e-mail and electronic submissions to PDF, HTML, and others

- The Seven Worst Proposal Mistakes illustrated with real-world examples

This is an essential book for anyone seeking to win contracts and sell projects."

Excerpt

Suppose you're a sales professional representing a vendor of specialized computer systems. You make a powerful presentation to representatives of a potential client, and you can tell it's gone beautifully. They're clearly impressed. They're flashing all kinds of buying signals, asking questions, focusing on their particular concerns. Then the chief decision maker says, [Well, this looks very promising. Why don't you put together a proposal for us that covers what we've talked about, the pricing issues, and some kind of basic delivery and installation schedule, and then we'll go from there. Okay?]

No problem, right?

Or suppose you represent a company that specializes in reducing energy consumption in large buildings. You're going through your e-mail one morning and come across a message announcing a competitive bid to retrofit an entire school district! You open the attached rfp document and glance through it. You can see that it's perfect for you. in fact, this is a job you really want. You can handle it well. You can make money on it and deliver a big roi for the school district. All you have to do is respond to the attached 125-page Request for Proposal and create a convincing argument as to why you're the right choice.

No problem, right?

One more: You're a partner in a mid-size accounting firm. You've managed to grow and develop a solid client base in your region by personally selling to small and medium-size businesses. But now you want to win some larger projects, take on bigger clients, perform complex audits, move into general business consulting, and generally move the level of the firm's activity up a notch or two. What that means, of course, is that now you'll be competing for jobs against other firms like your own and sometimes against the big, international firms. and instead of face-to-face selling and relationship building, you'll be competing through your proposals.

No problem, right?

Chances are, it is a problem. If you're like most people, you find writing proposals a big challenge.

Some of the very best account executives, program managers, engineers, designers, consultants, and business owners freeze up when they get back to their desks and have to put what they know and what they're recommending on paper. These are people who are capable of making outstanding presentations face to face and who can manage a complex program . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.