Online Collaborative Learning Communities: Twenty-One Designs to Building an Online Collaborative Learning Community

Online Collaborative Learning Communities: Twenty-One Designs to Building an Online Collaborative Learning Community

Online Collaborative Learning Communities: Twenty-One Designs to Building an Online Collaborative Learning Community

Online Collaborative Learning Communities: Twenty-One Designs to Building an Online Collaborative Learning Community

Synopsis

"This book provides comprehensive guides for teachers interested in integrating online collaboration into their instruction. The strategies, guidelines, and activities discussed originate from years of online teaching experience and are based on the author's own comprehensive research. Applicable at every academic level and in any subject, the text offers practical guidelines that are based on current learning theories - drawn from online learning and community learning theory - as well as the author's experience. Twenty-one designs, complete with guidelines, strategies, examples, and tips, will assist readers in designing their own online collaborative learning community, regardless of grade level or delivery system (online, face-to-face, or mixed). Researchers and others interested in learning and technology will find much of value in the author's research, experience, and conclusions, and practitioners looking to implement online collaboration will find this book an invaluable tool." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

Online teaching is a popular way to deliver instruction at any level of education. As an online instructor, I am always searching for effective technology-based instructional designs to improve my students' learning and my online teaching.

I remember the experiences I gained and the lessons I learned from the first time that I taught an online course. I posted all of my course materials online at the beginning of the semester, asked my students to participate in asynchronous discussions like threaded discussions and real-time discussions, and required students to conduct a few assignments. This sounded like typical online teaching of online courses. Unfortunately, I learned a hard lesson. Shortly after the class started, I found that none of the students participated in the asynchronous discussions. Afterward, the students told me that it wasn't required because there were no points assigned to the discussions so that is why they did not participate.

The following semester, the online discussion design was changed and a grade assigned. Then I learned another lesson. Students responded to my discussion questions and never returned to the discussion board to continue further online discussion. After posting, they disappeared. The online discussion activity was more completing assignments or answering questions with short answers. It was rare to see students respond to each other's postings in the discussion areas.

Another situation was that none of the students submitted postings during the week. When the weekend arrived, all the messages suddenly flooded in. As an inexperienced online instructor, I didn't want to do the course work during the weekend; I wanted my weekends to be my own . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.